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White oak

Generic Name: Red oak

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Black oak (Quercus tinctoria), British oak, common oak (Quercus pedunculata), durmast oak (Quercus sessiliflora), English oak (Quercus robur), Fabaceae (family), gallotannins, green oak (Quercus virens), holm oak (Quercus ilex), live oak (Quercus virens), Quebec oak, quercetin, red oak (Quercus petraea, Quercus rubra), royal protector, sessile oak, tanner's bark, tannins (phlobatannin, ellagitannins, gallic acid), turkey oak (Quercus cerris).

Background

Of the many species of oak found all over the world, the white oak (Quercus alba) is found primarily in North America. Although there are many species of the Quercus genus, many are thought to have similar properties. The parts of this tree used medicinally are the inner bark and the galls (growths that are produced in reaction to fungi or insects).

Traditionally, Native Americans and European settlers have used white oak for its astringent and anti-inflammatory properties. White oak was listed in the United States Pharmacopoeia from 1820 to 1919, and also in the National Formulary from 1916 to 1936.

Due to a lack of available scientific evidence, it is difficult to determine the safety of white oak. Adverse effects associated with white oak include gastrointestinal irritation, nausea and vomiting, which are theoretically due to its tannin content.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Antibacterial, antioxidant, antiseptic, antiviral, appetite stimulant, astringent, bleeding gums, bronchitis, burns, cancer, chilblains (inflammation caused by the cold), colds, cough, diabetes mellitus, diarrhea, digestive aid, dysentery (severe diarrhea), fever, gastrointestinal disorders, growth disorders, hemorrhage, hemorrhoids, inflammation, leukorrhea (vaginal discharge), lung conditions, rash (poison ivy), rheumatism, skin conditions, sore throat, strep throat, tonics, tuberculosis (prevention), ulcers, varicose veins, wound healing.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older):

There is no proven safe or effective dose for white oak. Traditionally, oak bark has been ground to a fine powder and inhaled freely to treat tuberculosis. For diarrhea or dysentery, a decoction of 1 ounce of bark in a quart of water, boiled down to a pint and taken in "wineglassful" doses has been used for no longer than 3-4 days. For chronic sore throat, a decoction of 1 ounce of bark in a quart of water boiled down to a pint and gargled has been used.

White oak has also been applied on the skin. Traditionally, a preparation has been formulated by mixing 2 teaspoons of coarsely powdered bark in 500 milliliters of water, followed by straining the solution. Oak bark is not recommended for topical use longer than 2-3 weeks. A decoction of 1 ounce of bark in a quart of water, boiled down to a pint has been applied topically for bleeding gums or piles.

Children (younger than 18 years):

There is no proven safe or effective dose for white oak, and use in children is not recommended.

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