Drugs A - Z

Vitamin O

a medical ga -

Generic Name: oxygen

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Aerobic oxygen, bis-beta-carboxyethyl germanium sesquioxide, Ge-132, germanium, organic germanium, organic germanium-132, oxygen, salt water, stabilized oxygen.

Note: This review does not cover vitamin O that contains germanium. Please see the individual monograph on germanium for more information.

Background

Oxygen is an integral part of human existence. Some have dubbed this element as "vitamin O," even though it is not a true vitamin. Proponents of vitamin O claim that disease occurs because the body is lacking in oxygen. Therefore, by ingesting oxygen through vitamin O supplements, these ailments can be reversed.

There appears to be two types of vitamin O products on the market. The first is an expensive health supplement that is composed largely of salt water and "stabilized" or "aerobic" oxygen. Companies, such as RGarden, marketed vitamin O (without germanium) claiming that it could cure or prevent serious diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and lung disease and when taken by mouth, enrich the bloodstream with supplemental oxygen. These claims were never substantiated with scientific evidence; however, numerous testimonials mention the effects of vitamin O on a variety of conditions. The second vitamin O product contains germanium, which when synthetically derived may be nontoxic and safe at high doses.

There is no scientific evidence currently available regarding the effectiveness of vitamin O or the benefit of ingesting stabilized or aerobic oxygen. Vitamin O (oral or topical oxygen) has not been proven to be an effective treatment for its claimed uses.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Alzheimer's disease, amyloidosis (rare disease that causes the buildup of amyloid, a protein and starch, in tissues and organs), antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries), asthma, cancer, canker sores, cataracts, chronic bronchitis, common cold, cough, diabetes mellitus, diabetic ulcers, ear infections, energy booster, fatigue, flu, glaucoma, headaches, heart disease, hemorrhoids, hypertension (high blood pressure), immunostimulation, improving breathing, lung disease, memory loss, metabolic disorders, obesity, pain, prostate problems, shingles, sleep disorders.

Dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for vitamin O in adults.

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for vitamin O in children.

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