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Tamarind (Tamarindus indica L.)

treats Bone diseases

Generic Name: Tamarindus indica

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Ambilis, amli, asam, asam jawa, Caesalpiniaceae (subfamily), chintachettu, chintapandu, da ma lin, daaih mah lahm, demirhindi, glyloid, glyloid sulphate 4324, imlee, imli, Indian date, indijska tamarinda, loh fong ji, loh mohng ji, luo huang zi, luo wang zi, ma-gyi-thi, puli, Pulpa tamarindorum, sampalok, sbar, siyambala, swee boey, tamalen, tamar hindi, tamarin, tamarind brown, tamarind flour, tamarind gum, tamarind kernel powder, tamarind nutshell activated carbon, tamarind seed polysaccharide, tamarind seed powder, tamarind seed xyloglucan (XG), tamarinde, tamarindienal, tamarindipuu, tamarindo, Tamarindus amyloid, Tamarindus indica L., Tamarindus indica Linn, Tamarindus indica seed, tamarynd, tamr al-hindi, tamre hendi, tentuli, teteli, tintiri, tintul, titri, TS-polysaccharide, ukwaju, xyloglucan.

Note: Tamarindus indica should not be confused with the dried fruit rind of Garcinia cambogia, also known as Malabar tamarind.

Background

Tamarind is native to tropical Africa and grows wild throughout the Sudan. It was introduced to India thousands of years ago. In Jordan and other Middle Eastern countries, tamarind juice from the tamarind tree is made into a drink prepared by infusing dried tamarind pulp. It has also been used for the preservation of food products. Tamarind may be used as a paste and sauce and included in recipes. Tamarind is also used in India as part of Ayurvedic herbal medicine.

In animal studies, tamarind has been found to lower serum cholesterol and blood sugar levels. Due to a lack of available human clinical trials, there is insufficient evidence to recommend tamarind for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia (high cholesterol) or diabetes.

Based on human study, tamarind intake may delay the progression of fluorosis by enhancing excretion of fluoride. However, additional research is needed to confirm these results.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Bone diseases (skeletal fluorosis prevention): Preliminary study has examined the use of tamarind for fluorosis prevention. Although beneficial outcomes have been reported, these results are not conclusive. Additional study is needed in this area.
Grade: C

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Anthelminthic (expels worms), antimicrobial, antiseptic, antiviral, asthma, astringent, bacterial skin infections (erysipelas), boils, chest pain, cholesterol metabolism disorders, colds, colic, conjunctivitis (pink eye), constipation (chronic or acute), diabetes, diarrhea (chronic), dry eyes, dysentery (severe diarrhea), eye inflammation, fever, food preservative, food uses (coloring), gallbladder disorders, gastrointestinal disorders, gingivitis, hemorrhoids, indigestion, insecticide, jaundice, keratitis (inflammation of the cornea), leprosy, liver disorders, nausea and vomiting (pregnancy-related), paralysis, poisoning (Datura plant), rash, rheumatism, saliva production, skin disinfectant/sterilization, sore throat, sores, sprains, sunscreen, sunstroke, swelling (joints), urinary stones, wound healing (corneal epithelium).

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older):

There is no proven safe or effective dose of tamarind. However, 10 grams daily for up to three weeks has been used to delay the progression of fluorosis by enhancing excretion of fluoride. As a laxative, 10-50 grams of tamarind paste as fermented fruit cubes has been used.

Children (younger than 18 years):

There is no proven safe or effective dose of tamarind in children. However, 10 grams daily for up to three weeks has been used to delay the progression of fluorosis by enhancing excretion of fluoride.

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