Drugs A - Z

Populus

Generic Name: Populus tremula

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Aspen, balm of gilead, cottonwood, pando, poplar, popple, Populus sieboldii, Populus tremula L., Populus tremuloides, quaking aspen, Salicaceae (family), the trembling giant.

Background

Populus is a genus of trees that includes the cottonwoods, poplars, and aspens, all of which are sometimes termed poplars or popples. Most of the available scientific evidence has reported on aspen, and there are very few reports mentioning cottonwood.

Aspen is a deciduous tree native to northern hemisphere temperate climates. Although aspen has shown antibacterial and antiplatelet activity, there is currently insufficient available evidence in humans to support the use of aspen for any indication.

Aspen pollen, bark, wood, and saw dust are known to cause allergic reactions in sensitive people, including contact dermatitis, rhinoconjunctivitis, and asthma, and there may be cross-sensitivity to other tree pollens, especially in the Salicaceae family.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lists poplar buds (Populus balsamifera, P. candicans Ait., and P. nigra L.) as Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) for flavoring.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet (blood thinner), rheumatism.

Dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for Populus species in adults.

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for Populus species in children.

Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to Populus species.

Salicyl alcohol and salicylaldehyde in aspen bark, wood, and sawdust may cause contact allergic reactions, such as skin rash or eczema.

Side Effects and Warnings

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) lists poplar buds (Populus balsamifera, P. candicans Ait., and P. nigra L.) as Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) for flavoring.

Salicyl alcohol and salicylaldehyde in aspen bark, wood, and sawdust may cause contact allergic reactions, such as skin rash or eczema.

Aspen pollen may cause allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma and there may be cross-sensitivity with other tree pollens, especially in the Salicaceae family.

Use cautiously in patients with coagulation or platelet (blood clotting) disorders or taking anticoagulants or antiplatelets (blood thinners).

Use cautiously in patients with sensitivity to aspen pollen, bark, wood, or sawdust, or other species of the Salicaceae family.

Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

Populus species are not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

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