Drugs A - Z

Niacin (Vitamin B3, Nicotinic acid), Niacinamide

a vitamin b complex - treats Atherosclerosis, Age-related macular degeneration, Alzheimer's disease/... more

Generic Name: niacinamide

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

3-Pyridine carboxamide, anti-blacktongue factor, antipellagra factor, B-complex vitamin, benicot, Efacin®, ENDUR-ACIN®, Enduramide®, Hexopal®, NIAC®, Niacor®, Niaspan®, Nicalex®, nicamid, Nicamin®, Nico-400®, Nicobid®, Nicolar®, Nicotinex®, nicosedine, Nico-Span®, nicotinamide, nicotinic acid amide, nicotinic amide, nicotylamidum, Papulex®, pellagra preventing factor, Slo-Niacin®, Tega-Span®, Tri-B3®, Wampocap®.

Background

Vitamin B3 is made up of niacin (nicotinic acid) and its amide, niacinamide, and can be found in many foods, including yeast, meat, fish, milk, eggs, green vegetables, and cereal grains. Dietary tryptophan is also converted to niacin in the body. Vitamin B3 is often found in combination with other B vitamins including thiamine, riboflavin, pantothenic acid, pyridoxine, cyanocobalamin, and folic acid.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

High cholesterol (niacin): Niacin is a well-accepted treatment for high cholesterol. Multiple studies show that niacin (not niacinamide) has significant benefits on levels of high-density cholesterol (HDL or "good cholesterol"), with better results than prescription drugs such as "statins" like atorvastatin (Lipitor®). There are also benefits on levels of low-density cholesterol (LDL or "bad cholesterol"), although these effects are less dramatic. Adding niacin to a second drug such as a statin may increase the effects on low-density lipoproteins. The use of niacin for the treatment of dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes has been controversial because of the possibility of worsening glycemic control. Patients should check with a physician and pharmacist before starting niacin.
Grade: A

Pellagra (niacin): Niacin (vitamin B3) and niacinamide are U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved for the treatment of niacin deficiency. Pellagra is a nutritional disease that develops due to insufficient dietary amounts of vitamin B3 or the chemical it is made from, tryptophan. Symptoms of pellagra include skin disease, diarrhea, dementia, and depression.
Grade: A

Atherosclerosis (niacin): Niacin decreases blood levels of cholesterol and lipoprotein (a), which may reduce the risk of atherosclerosis ("hardening" of the arteries). However, niacin also can increase homocysteine levels, which may have the opposite effect. Overall, the scientific evidence supports the use of niacin in combination with other drugs (but not alone) to decrease cholesterol and slow the process of atherosclerosis. More research is needed in this area before a firm conclusion can be drawn.
Grade: B

Prevention of a second heart attack (niacin): Niacin decreases levels of cholesterol, lipoprotein (a), and fibrinogen, which can reduce the risk of heart disease. However, niacin also increases homocysteine levels, which can increase this risk. Numerous studies have looked at the effects of niacin, alone and in combination with other drugs, for the prevention of heart disease and fatal heart attacks. Overall, this research suggests benefits of niacin, especially when combined with other cholesterol-lowering drugs.
Grade: B

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD): Niacin may benefit the choroidal blood vessels, which underlie the region of the retina called the macula. Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may result from disrupted blood flow in the choroidal vessels. Studies suggest that niacin may be used to treat AMD, but more well-designed studies are needed.
Grade: C

Alzheimer's disease/ cognitive decline: Dementia can be caused by severe niacin insufficiency, but it is unclear whether variation in intake of niacin in the usual diet is linked to neurodegenerative decline or Alzheimer's disease (AD). Further research is needed before a conclusion can be drawn.
Grade: C

Diabetes (Type 1/Type 2): Niacinamide may prevent diabetes or delay the need for insulin. More research is needed to determine if niacinamide delays or prevents the onset of insulin dependence in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Niacin has been used to treat dyslipidemia associated with type 2 diabetes. However, this treatment has been controversial because it may worsen glycemic control. Patients should seek medical advice before starting niacin.
Grade: C

Headaches: There is not enough information about the treatment or prevention of headaches with niacin. More research is needed.
Grade: C

High blood phosphorous level (hyperphosphatemia): Niacinamide may reduce the high serum phosphate levels in hyperphosphatemia. However, more research is needed before niacinamide can be used to treat hyperphosphatemia.
Grade: C

Liver cancer: A large, five-year study examined the effect of niacin supplementation on liver cancer. Although niacin did not appear to prevent liver cancer, deaths due to liver cancer were decreased in those who took supplements containing niacin. The ability of niacin to prevent liver cancer deaths should be further examined.
Grade: C

Osteoarthritis (niacinamide): Preliminary human studies suggest that niacinamide may be useful in the treatment of osteoarthritis. Further research is needed before a recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Skin conditions: Niacinamide has been used in skin care products, including moisturizers, anti-aging products, and rosacea treatments. The benefits of niacinamide in skin care needs to be further studied before recommendations are made.
Grade: C

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