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Ladies mantle (Alchemilla vulgaris)

Generic Name: Alchemilla vulgaris

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Alchemillae herba, bear's foot, common ladies mantle, ellagic acid, flavonoids, Frauenmantle, Frauenmantelkraut, ladies cloak, leontopodium, lion's foot, nine hooks, pied-de-lion, quercetol, quercetin, stellaria, tannins.

Background

Ladies mantle was named in the 16th century by Jerome Bock, also known as Tragus, and it appears under his name in the book History of Plants, published in 1532. Ladies mantle is referred to as lady's cloak or mantle because of its association with the Virgin Mary. The lobes of the leaf are said to resemble the scalloped edges of a mantle. It has also been referred to as lion's foot and bear's foot, most likely because of the resemblance of its spreading root leaves to such feet.

Ladies mantle has been used for many centuries in Europe including in Sweden and Germany. Some experts consider ladies mantle to be good for treating wounds due to its coagulation (blood clotting), astringent and styptic (stops bleeding) properties. It has also been used as a mouth rinse after dental procedures to help stop bleeding. Ladies mantle has been used for a variety of female conditions such as menstrual disorders including excessive menstruation and menopause, as an aid during conception, in the prevention of miscarriages, and to help the body heal after childbirth. However, clinical data is lacking.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Acne, anti-convulsant, anti-inflammatory, anti-hemorrhagic, appetite stimulant, astringent, coagulation (blood clotting), diabetes, diarrhea, diuretic, fertility (conception aid), fibroids (benign tumors in or around the uterus that sometimes can cause miscarriages), child birth (healing aid), high blood pressure, hormone imbalances (estrogen or testosterone), menopause, menorrhagia (excessive menstruation), miscarriage (prevention), rheumatism, sleep aid, stomach problems, styptic (stops bleeding), wound healing.

Dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for ladies mantle. Traditionally, drinking a tea made by steeping the chopped leaves in hot water for 15 minutes, then straining and ingesting for 20 consecutive days, has been used as a conception aid. To treat excessive menstruation, one ounce of dried herb has been infused in one pint of boiling water to make a tea. This tea is then consumed in amounts similar to a teacupful (size of teacup not stated). Ladies mantle has also been used as a vaginal douche to treat leukorrhea (vaginal discharge).

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for ladies mantle in children.

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