Drugs A - Z

Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis)

treats Dementia and Mosquito repellent

Generic Name: Simmondsia chinensis

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

D-pinitol, jojoba beans, jojoba bean oil, jojoba cotyledons, jojoba esters, jojoba liquid wax (JLW), JLW, jojoba meal, jojoba meal phospholipids, jojoba oil (Joj), jojoba protein, jojoba seed, jojoba seedlings, jojoba seed meal, jojoba seed xyloglucan, jojoba wax, jojoba xyloglucan oligosaccharides, lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), myo-inositol sucrose, phosphatidylcholine (PC), pinitol alpha-D-galactosides, rimethylsilyl derivatives, Simmondsia chinensis, Simmondsiaceae (family), simmondsin, simmondsin ferulates, simmondsins, simmondsin derivative.

Background

Jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) is a shrub native to deserts in Arizona, California and Mexico and is also found in some arid African countries. The oil (or liquid wax) in jojoba seeds contains extremely long (C36-C46) straight chain fatty acids in the form of wax esters, as opposed to triglycerides. It is this structure that allows it to be easily refined for use in cosmetics and as a carrier oil for fragrances. Jojoba meal, remaining after oil extraction, is rich in protein. In Japan, jojoba oil (wax) is used as a food additive.

Jojoba oil is used most commonly as a carrier oil for topical application or aromatherapy. At this time, there are no high-quality human trials available supporting the efficacy of jojoba oil for any indication. Potential effects of jojoba oil include anti-inflammatory, cholesterol-reduction and mosquito-repellant effects.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Dementia: Jojoba oil is traditionally used as a carrier or massage oil. There is currently not enough available evidence to recommend for or against the use of jojoba oil for dementia.
Grade: C

Mosquito repellent: There is currently not enough available evidence to recommend for or against the use of jojoba oil as a mosquito repellent.
Grade: C

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Anti-aging, anti-inflammatory, appetite suppressant, cosmetic uses, food uses (additive), insecticidal, reflexology treatment, skin disorders (dry skin), topical (applied to the skin) drug delivery, weight loss, wound-healing.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older):

There is no proven safe or effective dose for jojoba in adults. Avoid taking jojoba products by mouth.

Children (younger than 18 years):

There is no proven safe or effective dose for jojoba in children. Avoid taking jojoba products by mouth.

Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to jojoba or its constituents. Contact dermatitis to jojoba oil has been described in case reports.

Side Effects and Warnings

Side effects of jojoba are mainly limited to contact dermatitis and gastrointestinal concerns in animals fed large amounts of jojoba meal. Avoid oral consumption of jojoba products.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Jojoba is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence. Although not well studied in humans, ingesting jojoba meal may lower fetal and placental weights.

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