Drugs A - Z

Jimson weed (Datura stramonium L.)

Generic Name: Datura

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Alkaloids, angel's trumpet, apple of peru, atropine, belladonna alkaloids, complex-type oligosaccharide binding lectin, crazy tea, Datura arborea, D. aurea, D. candida, Datura inoxia, Datura L., Datura metel, D. sanguinea, Datura stramonium, Datura stramonium agglutinin, Datura stramonium L. var. tatula (L.) Torr., Datura suaveolens, Datura tatula L., devil's seed, devil's snare, devil's trumpet, DSA, endemic nightshade, hyoscamine, Jamestown weed, jimsonweed, lectins, "loco" weed, mad hatter, malpitte, moonflower seed, nightshade, pods, scopolamine, sobi-lobi, Solanaceae (family), stinkweed, TAL, thorn apple, thornapple leaf, tolguacha, toxic alkaloids, tropane belladonna alkaloids, trumpet lily, zombie's cucumber.

Background

Jimson weed (Datura stramonium) grows throughout the world and has been known as a hallucinogenic plant for centuries. It has reportedly been used by Shamans and native peoples during sacred rituals. In India, the smoke of jimson weed has been used to treat asthma.

Jimson weed may cause extreme toxicity including death. Even very small amounts may cause death. Jimson weed is therefore not used medicinally today, although some alkaloids from jimson weed are approved drugs.

In early research, jimson weed has been studied for asthma and chronic bronchitis, however, clinical evidence supporting any safe or effective use of jimson weed is lacking at this time.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Antibacterial, antimicrobial, antitumor, asthma, colorectal cancer, hallucinogenic, insecticide, muscle spasms, Parkinson's disease (saliva production control), sedative, whooping cough.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for jimson weed. Jimson weed may cause extreme toxicity.

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for jimson weed, and use in children is not recommended. Jimson weed may cause extreme toxicity and even small amounts may cause death in children.

Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies

Avoid with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to jimson weed, its constituents, other Datura species, or other plants in the nightshade family, such as tobacco, peppers, eggplant, potatoes, and tomatoes.

Side Effects and Warnings

Jimson weed may cause extreme toxicity including death. Even very small amounts may cause death.

Jimson weed may cause rapid heart rate, life threatening abnormal heart rhythm, high blood pressure, respiratory arrest, psychosis, delirium, disorientation, hallucinations, seizures, amnesia, coma, and may worsen neurological disorders.

Jimson weed may increase the risk of bleeding. Caution is advised in patients with bleeding disorders or taking drugs that may increase the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.

Jimson weed may also cause liver damage, kidney damage, difficulty urinating or urinary retention, and blurred vision.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Jimson weed is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to potential for extreme toxicity.

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