Drugs A - Z

Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus)

treats High blood sugar/glucose intolerance

Generic Name: Artocarpus heterophyllus

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Artocarpus, Artocarpus asperulus, Artocarpus heterophyllus, Artocarpus incisa, Artocarpus integer, Artocarpus integrifolia, Artocarpus masticata, Artocarpus melinoxylus, Artocarpus parva, Artocarpus petelotii, breadfruit, jacalin, jack fruit, jackfruit seed, Moraceae (family).

Background

Jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus), which refers to both a species of tree and its fruit, is native to southwestern India and Sri Lanka. Jackfruit was reportedly cultivated for food as early as the 6th Century BC in India. At approximately 25 centimeters in diameter, jackfruit is reportedly the largest tree-borne fruit in the world. The fruit juices are extremely sticky, so people often oil their hands before preparing the fruit.

The fruit can be ingested while the wood is used for furniture and musical instruments. Recent laboratory studies show that lectins found in jackfruit and its seeds may have antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, and immunostimulative properties. However, clinical study is lacking. The currently available research examines the role of jackfruit leaves in increasing glucose tolerance. More studies in humans are needed to define jackfruit's potential role in diabetes.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

High blood sugar/glucose intolerance: Jackfruit leaves may improve glucose tolerance. However, there is little available research in this area. Additional study is needed.
Grade: C

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Antibacterial, antifungal, contraception, antiviral, food uses, immunostimulation.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older):

There is no proven safe or effective dose of jackfruit in adults. A hot-water extract of Artocarpus heterophyllus leaves equivalent to 20 grams per kilogram of starting material has been taken by mouth for high blood sugar/glucose intolerance.

Children (younger than 18 years):

There is no proven safe or effective dose of jackfruit in children.

Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to jackfruit (Artocarpus heterophyllus). In some patients, jackfruit is a Bet v 1 (birch pollen allergen)-related food allergy.

Side Effects and Warnings

Jackfruit has few reported side effects. Use cautiously in patients with birch pollen allergies.

Although not well studied in humans, jackfruit may increase coagulation. Caution is advised in patients with blood disorders. Jackfruit may also alter glucose tolerance, and patients with diabetes should consult with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, to check for interactions.

Jackfruit seeds may have immunostimulative effects. Use cautiously in patients using immunosuppression therapy or with transplanted tissues.

Use cautiously in patients attempting to become pregnant as jackfruit seeds may markedly inhibit libido, sexual arousal, sexual vigor, and sexual performance (induce mild erectile dysfunction) in males. However, jackfruit seeds do not appear to alter ejaculating competence or fertility.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Jackfruit is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence. Although not well studied in humans, jackfruit seeds may transiently inhibit libido, sexual arousal, sexual vigor, and sexual performance (induce mild erectile dysfunction). However, jackfruit seeds do not appear to alter ejaculating competence or fertility.

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