Drugs A - Z

Ignatia (Strychnos ignatii)

treats Emotional disorders

Generic Name: Ignatia

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Ignatia, Ignatia amara, Ignatius bean, Lu Song Guo, Saint Ignatius bean, St. Ignatius bean, Strychnos ignatia.

Background

Ignatia amara is a homeopathic remedy derived from the seeds of the St. Ignatius bean, Strychnos ignatii, a tree found in the Philippines and other parts of Southeast Asia. It is used as a homeopathic remedy because of its effects on the nervous system.

Commonly called "homeopathic Prozac," ignatia is often used in treating grief stages. Ignatia was commonly used in the 1800s but has not been studied in modern scientific trials. Although there is little scientific evidence regarding the medicinal use of ignatia, it was added to Materia Medica (book of written descriptions of homeopathic medicines) in the early 1800s.

Chinese doctors have used ignatia for emotional disorders such as depression and anxiety. Folk healers also used ignatia to treat headaches, sore throats, coughs, and menstrual problems.

Ignatia is not widely used because it contains strychnine, which can be fatal to humans.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Emotional disorders (emergency use): Currently, there is insufficient evidence to recommend homeopathic ignatia for emergency use of emotional disorders. Additional study is needed in this area.
Grade: C

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Allergies, anti-inflammatory, anxiety, apprehension, atonic dyspepsia (upset stomach), backaches, bedwetting, belching, bereavement, chills, choking, climacteric symptoms, constipation, coughs, cravings, delusions, depression, faintness, fever, follicular inflammation, gastralgia (stomach pain), grief, hallucinations, headaches, hemorrhoids, hiccups, hysteria, inability to work, indigestion, inflammation, irritability, itching, loss of appetite, menopausal symptoms, menstrual problems, mood swings, mouth dryness, nasal problems, nausea and vomiting, nervousness, oversensitivity to all stimuli, pain, perspiration, placebo alternative, post-partum depression, rectal prolapse (rectum drops down outside the anus), rectal spasms, refresh body function, restless legs syndrome, sensitivity to noise, sleeplessness, sore throat, spasm in vocal cords, spasmodic conditions, sweat, thrush (mouth infection), tonic, trembling, unconsciousness, uncontrollable grief, weakness, weepiness.

Dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for ignatia.

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for ignatia in children.

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