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Date palm (Phoenix dactylifera)

treats Skin aging

Generic Name: Phoenix dactylifera

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Arecaceae (family), date sugar palm, edible dates, fluorine, pectin, Phoenix canariensis, Phoenix dactylifera, Phoenix sylvestris Roxb, profilin, selenium, sun-dried date.

Background

The date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) has a long history of cultivation and its fruit has been used as a source of nutrition. Although its exact native distribution is unknown, it probably originated somewhere in the desert oases of northern Africa and perhaps also southwest Asia.

Today, date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) fruits are part of the daily diet in many Middle Eastern and neighboring countries. Extracts of the date palm kernel have been evaluated in scientific studies for use as a topical antiwrinkle agent. Date palm is not listed on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) list.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Skin aging (wrinkles): Plant hormones found in date palm kernel may have anti-aging benefits. However, currently, there is insufficient available evidence to recommend for or against the use of date palm as an antiwrinkle agent.
Grade: C

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Cancer, decaying teeth (prevention).

Dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for date palm in adults. Date palm kernel has been studied in a cream formula and applied twice a day for five weeks in the eye area to reduce fine wrinkles; this dose has not been proven effective.

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose for date palm in children.

Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to date palm fruit or pollen. Date palm is among the most common allergens in Arab countries. Allergies to pollen from date palms and similarly cultivated species have been shown to cause allergic rhinitis, wheezing, rhinoconjunctivitis, and bronchial asthma.

Side Effects and Warnings

Date palm is likely safe when used in food amounts in nonallergic people. However, date palm is not listed on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) list.

Date palm fruit has been associated with oral allergy syndrome, allergic rhinitis, wheezing, rhinoconjunctivitis, and bronchial asthma.

Foreign body puncture wounds due to date palm thorns or thorn fragments, some causing systemic illness and requiring surgical removal, have been reported. Several cases of articular synovitis, bony pseudotumors, granulomatous synovitis, and synovitis (all types of join inflammation) due to embedded date palm thorns or thorn fragments have been reported in regions where date palm trees are an indigenous species.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Date palm is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

Interactions with Drugs

Insufficient available evidence.

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

Insufficient available evidence.

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