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Damiana (Turnera diffusa)

an herbal product - treats Female sexual dysfunction and Weight loss

Generic Name: damiana

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Bignoniaceae (family), bourrique, caryophyllene, caryophyllene oxide, Damiana aphrodisiaca, damiana de Guerrero, damiana herb, damiana leaf, delta-cadinene, elemene, flavone glycoside, herba de la pastora, flavonoids, Mexican damiana, Mexican holly, mizibcoc, old woman's broom, oreganillo, p-arbutin, ram goat dash along, rosemary, Turneraceae (family), Turnera aphrodisiaca, Turnera diffusa, Turnera diffusa Willd. ex Schult., Turnera diffusa Willd. var. afrodisiaca (Ward) Urb., Turnerae diffusae folium, Turnerae diffusae herba, Turnera microphylla, Turnera ulmifolia.

Background

Damiana includes the species Turnera diffusa and Turnera aphrodisiaca. These closely-related plants belong to the family of Turneraceae and grow wild in the subtropical regions of the Americas and Africa. Damiana is widely used in traditional medicine as an anti-cough, diuretic (increasing urine flow), and aphrodisiac agent. Recent studies in rats seem to support the folk reputation of Turnera diffusa as a sexual stimulant.

In the Mexican culture, damiana is used for gastrointestinal disorders. Damiana extract has shown antibacterial activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, which may have gastrointestinal effects.

Damiana appears on the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) GRAS (generally recognized as safe) list and is widely used as a food flavoring. However, because damiana contains low levels of cyanide-like compounds, excessive doses may be dangerous.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Female sexual dysfunction: Traditionally, damiana has been used as a sexual stimulant. ArginMax® for women contains damiana, but also L-arginine, ginseng, ginkgo, multivitamins, and minerals. Larger, well-designed studies using damiana alone are needed before a recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Weight loss (obese patients): "YGD," containing yerbe mate (leaves of Ilex paraguayenis), guarana (seeds of Paullinia cupana) and damiana (leaves of Turnera diffusa var. aphrodisiaca), is an herbal preparation frequently used for weight loss. More studies using damiana alone are needed before a recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, aphrodisiac, asthma, bedwetting, constipation, cough, depression, diabetes mellitus, diuretic, energy, gastrointestinal disorders, gastrointestinal motility, hallucinogenic, headache, impotence, laxative, respiratory problems, sexual dysfunction (female), sexual performance, muscle relaxant (smooth muscle), stimulant, ulcers, weight reduction.

Dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

In general, 2-4 grams of dried leaf, three times a day, or the same dose steeped in 150 milliliters of boiling water for 5-10 minutes, consumed two to three times a day has been traditionally used. Also, 2-4 milliliters of liquid damiana extract or 0.5-1 milliliterof tincture three times a day has been used. 3-4 grams of powdered leaf in tablets or capsules can be used two to three times a day, and 325-650 milligrams per dose of dried extract powder has been taken.

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven safe or effective dose of damiana in children.

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