Drugs A - Z

Clay

treats Fecal incontinence associated with psychiatric disorders, Functional gastrointestinal disorde... more

Generic Name: clay

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Akipula, aluminium silicate, anhydrous aluminum silicates, askipula, beidellitic montmorillonite, benditos, bioelectrical minerals, chalk, cipula, clay dirt, clay dust, clay lozenges, clay suspension products, clay tablets, colloidal minerals, colloidal trace minerals, fossil farina, humic shale, Indian healing clay, kaolin, kipula, mountain meal, NovaSil, panito del senor (Spanish), plant-derived liquid minerals, Terra sigillata, tirra santa, white clay, white mud.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Fecal incontinence associated with psychiatric disorders (encopresis): clay modeling therapy in children: There is not enough scientific research to support a recommendation for play with modeling clay as an effective therapeutic intervention in children with constipation and encopresis (involuntary bowel movement).
Grade: C

Functional gastrointestinal disorders: There is not enough scientific evidence to recommend the medicinal use of clay by mouth in patients with gastrointestinal disorders. Some clay preparations have been found to be similar to Kaolin® and Kaopectate®, which are used to treat gastrointestinal disturbances including diarrhea. However, overall, there are significant potential risks that accompany the use of clay, including intestinal blockage and injury as well as lead poisoning.
Grade: C

Mercuric chloride poisoning: Clay lozenges have been used historically in the treatment of mercuric chloride poisoning and were officially mentioned in several European pharmacopoeias, including the Royal College, until the middle 19th Century. However, there is not enough scientific evidence to recommend the use of clay by mouth for poisoning at this time, as there is a risk that the clay itself may contain contaminants.
Grade: C

Protection from aflatoxins: Aflatoxins are toxic substances from the fungus Aspergillis flavus. This fungus infects peanuts, and ingestion of aflatoxins from peanuts and cereals (primarily in warm and humid regions) has been associated with liver cancers in humans and multiple cancers in animals. Phyllosilicate clay has been shown to adhere to aflatoxins in laboratory study, and HSACS clay in animal diets may diminish or block exposure to aflatoxins. However, the risks of chronic clay exposure likely do not justify the potential benefit.
Grade: C

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Acidosis (too much acid in the blood), animal bites, blood purification, cancer, constipation, detoxification, diarrhea, dysentery, eye disorders, fevers, heart disorders, menstruation difficulties, nausea and vomiting during pregnancy, nutrition, plague, poisoning, skin fairness, smoking, syphilis, vomiting, water purification, weight loss.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

There is not enough scientific evidence to recommend the safe use of clay.

Children (younger than 18 years)

There is not enough scientific evidence to recommend the safe use of clay in children.

Licensed from
The Healthline Site, its content, such as text, graphics, images, search results, HealthMaps, Trust Marks, and other material contained on the Healthline Site ("Content"), its services, and any information or material posted on the Healthline Site by third parties are provided for informational purposes only. None of the foregoing is a substitute for professional medical advice, examination, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on the Healthline Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or 911 immediately. Please read the Terms of Service for more information regarding use of the Healthline Site.
Advertisement

Recommended for You

Advertisement