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Chondroitin sulfate

a nutraceutical product - treats Coronary artery disease, Interstitial cystitis, Osteoarthritis, Pso... more

Generic Name: chondroitin

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

ACS4-ACS6, ADAMTS7B, aggrecan, agrin, biglycan, biostat, CDS, chondroitin sulfate A, chondroitin sulfate C, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan, chondroitin sulfates, chondroitin sulfuric acid, chondroitin sulphate, chondroitin sulphate A sodium, chondroitin-4-sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, chondroitinase ABC, chondroprotective agents, chondrosine, chonsurid, CHST11, condroitin, Condrosulf®, Condrosulf 400®, CS, CS/DS, CSA, CSC, CSPG D-galactosamine, decorin, dentin sialoprotein, DexSol®, D-glucuronic acid, disease modifying osteoarthritis drugs, DMOAD, extended chondroitin sulfate/dermatan, fucosylated chondroitin sulfate, GAG, galacotosaminoglucuronoglycan sulfate (Matrix®), glucosamine hydrochloride, glucosamine salts, glucosamine sulfate, glucosaminoglycan, Matrix®, neurocan, neuroglycan C, NGC, Optisol®, perineuronal nets, PNs, sodium chondroitin sulfate 0.2%, sodium chondroitin, Structum®, sulphate, symptomatic slow acting drug in osteoarthritis type XV, Syndecan, SYSADOA type XV, Uropol®-S, Viscoat®.

Background

Chondroitin was first extracted and purified in the 1960s. It is currently manufactured from natural sources (shark/beef cartilage or bovine trachea) or by synthetic means. The consensus of expert and industry opinions supports the use of chondroitin and its common partner agent, glucosamine, for improving symptoms and stopping (or possibly reversing) the degenerative process of osteoarthritis.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Osteoarthritis: Multiple controlled clinical trials since the 1980s have examined the use of oral chondroitin in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee and other locations (spine, hips, finger joints). Most of these studies have reported significant benefits in terms of symptoms (such as pain), function (such as mobility), and reduced medication requirements (such as anti-inflammatories). However, most studies have been brief (six month duration) with methodological weaknesses. Despite these weaknesses and potential for bias in the available results, the weight of scientific evidence points to a beneficial effect when chondroitin is used for 6-24 months. Longer-term effects are not clear. Early studies of chondroitin applied to the skin have also been conducted. Chondroitin is frequently used with glucosamine. Glucosamine has independently been demonstrated to benefit patients with osteoarthritis (particularly of the knee). It remains unclear if there is added benefit of using these two agents together compared to using either alone.
Grade: A

Bladder control: Several studies have shown promise for using chondroitin for interstitial cystitis, which is a chronic inflammation of the bladder. Chondroitin sulfate may also be helpful in patients with overactive bladder or unstable bladder control. Additional evidence is necessary before a firm conclusion can be drawn.
Grade: B

Coronary artery disease (secondary prevention): Several studies in the early 1970s assessed the use of oral chondroitin for the prevention of subsequent coronary events in patients with a history of heart disease or heart attack. Although favorable results were reported, due to methodological weaknesses in this research and the widespread current availability of more proven drug therapies for patients in this setting, a recommendation cannot be made in this area.
Grade: C

Interstitial cystitis: There is preliminary research administering intravesicular chondroitin in patients diagnosed with interstitial cystitis. Additional evidence is necessary before a firm conclusion can be drawn.
Grade: C

Iron absorption enhancement: Early research suggests that taking chondroitin with iron may enhance iron absorption in healthy individuals. It is unclear whether taking chondroitin would help patients with iron deficiencies absorb more iron. More research needs to be done in this area before a strong recommendation can be made.
Grade: C

Ophthalmologic uses: Chondroitin is sometimes used as a component of eye solutions used for keratoconjunctivitis, corneal preservation, and intraocular pressure. These solutions should only be used under the supervision of an ophthalmologist. Additional study is needed in this area.
Grade: C

Psoriasis: Early study suggests that chondroitin may help treat psoriasis. Well-designed clinical trials are needed to confirm these results.
Grade: C

Muscle soreness (delayed onset): Chondroitin was thought to be beneficial for delayed onset muscle soreness because chondroitin sulfate is often used as an anti-inflammatory and pain reliever for osteoarthritis. However, early research does not support this use. More research is needed in this area to confirm these results.
Grade: D

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