Drugs A - Z

Celery (Apium graveolens)

treats Mosquito repellent

Generic Name: Apium graveolens

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

5-methoxypsoralen, alpha-methylene gamma-butyrolactone group, Apiaceae (family), Apium graveolens, Apium graveolens L., celeriac, celery extract, celery juice, celery profilin, celery root, celery seed, celery seed oil, celery soup, celery spice, celery tuber, cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants, crude celery, furocoumarins, immunogenic food, methoxsalen (8-methoxypsoralen), phthalide, profilin, psoralen, raw celery, sedanolide, Umbelliferae (family).

Background

Wild celery can be found throughout Europe, the Mediterranean, and parts of Asia. The leaves, stalks, root, and seeds can be eaten. In western cuisine, the stalks of its domesticated cousin are commonly used in cooking and may be eaten raw alone or in salads, or as a cooked ingredient in various recipes. Celery seed has also been used as a diuretic (increase urine flow) and to treat gout (foot inflammation). However, there is insufficient evidence in humans to support the use of celery for any indication.

Allergy to celery is fairly common, as celery contains an allergen similar to the birch pollen allergen. Both raw and cooked celery can cause reactions that range from contact dermatitis to anaphylactic shock.

The ancient Greeks and Egyptians cultivated celery, which was probably originally used as a medicine. Some Egyptian tombs also contained celery leaves and flowers.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Mosquito repellent: Celery extract may be an effective mosquito repellent. Although this study is promising, additional study is needed in this area.
Grade: C

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Antioxidant, arthritis, cancer, inflammatory joint diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis), larvicide (insecticide), tonic.

Dosing

Adults (over 18 years old)

There is no proven effective dose for celery in adults. Celery is likely safe in food amounts.

Children (under 18 years old)

There is no proven effective dose for celery in children. Celery is likely safe in food amounts.

Safety

DISCLAIMER: Many complementary techniques are practiced by healthcare professionals with formal training, in accordance with the standards of national organizations. However, this is not universally the case, and adverse effects are possible. Due to limited research, in some cases only limited safety information is available.

Allergies

Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to celery (Apium graveolens) or its constituents. Allergy to celery is fairly common, especially among those with sensitivity to birch pollen-related allergens. Raw celery, cooked celery, and celery juice can all cause allergic reactions. Reactions range from contact dermatitis to anaphylactic shock. In addition, celery ingestion or contact and subsequent exposure to ultraviolet radiation can cause phytophotodermatitis. Symptoms of celery allergy have included laryngeal edema, celery-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis, and anaphylactic shock.

Side Effects and Warnings

Celery is likely safe when used in food amounts in non-allergic individuals.

Allergy to celery is fairly common, especially among those with sensitivity to birch pollen-related allergens. Avoid in patients eating large amounts of psoralen-containing foods or herbs, such as limes, lemons, parsley, figs, parsnip, carrots, certain oranges, some natural grasses, and dill.

Use cautiously in patients with bile secretion disorders.

Avoid high celery intake in pregnant patients.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Celery is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence. High celery intake may increase the risk of sensitization against food allergens.

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