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Bellis perennis (daisy)

treats Bleeding

Generic Name: Bellis perennis

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Apigenin glycosides, Arnica montana, Asteraceae (family), asterogenic acid glycosides, bairnwort, bayogenin, Bellidis flos, Bellis sylvestris, bellissaponin, Bellorita, besysaponin, bisdesmosidic glycosides, bruisewort, Chrysanthemum leucanthemum L., common daisy, Compositae (family), consolida, daisy, day's eye, dog daisy, English daisy, European daisy, flavonoids, flavonol glycosides, Gänseblümchen (German), glycosides, hen and chickens, Herb Margaret, La Paquerette (French), lawn daisy, little daisy, Madeliefje (Netherlands), Marguerite, Maslieben (German), Maya, meadow daisy, monodesmosidic glycosides, oxeye daisy, polyacetylenes, polygalacic acid, red daisy, saponins, Sedmikráska chudobka (Czech), triterpenoid glycosides, triterpenoid saponins, virgaureasaponin, wild daisy.

Note: Daisy is also the common name for oxeye daisy, Chrysanthemum leucanthemum L., another weedy species found in fields and along roadsides throughout the United States. This species is native to Europe and Asia, and has also been naturalized as a weed in North America.

Background

Bellis perennis is a common European species of daisy. Although many other related plants are also called daisy, Bellis perennis is often considered the archetypal species. It is sometimes called common daisy or English daisy. It is native to western, central, and northern Europe, but is commonly found as an invasive plant in North America.

The medicinal properties of Bellis perennis have been recorded in herbals as far back as the 16th century. John Gerard, the 16th century herbalist, recommended English daisy as a catarrh (inflammation of mucous membrane) cure, as a remedy for heavy menstruation, migraine, and to promote healing of bruises and swellings.

Infusions of the flowers and leaves have been used to treat a wide range of other disorders including rhinitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and liver and kidney disorders. An insect repellent spray has also been made from an infusion of the leaves. A strong decoction of the roots has been recommended for the long-term treatment of both scurvy and eczema, and a mild decoction may ease complaints of the respiratory tract.

Bellis perennis has also been used traditionally for treating wounds. Chewing the fresh leaves is said to be a cure for mouth ulcers. In homeopathy, Bellis perennis is often used in combination with Arnica montana to treat bruising and trauma.

Common daisy is widely used in homeopathy, but is currently only rarely used in herbal medicine. Although homeopathic dosing is generally recognized as safe (GRAS; U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) designation), there is a lack of available scientific evidence to support claims for effectiveness related to the use of Bellis perennis. More research is needed in this area. Recent research has explored the possibility of using the plant in HIV therapy.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Bleeding (postpartum, mild): Homeopathic Bellis perennis has been used for bruising, bleeding, and recovery from surgery. Additional study of Bellis perennis alone is needed to make a firm recommendation.
Grade: C

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