Drugs A - Z

Asparagus (Asparagus officinalis)

treats Galactagogue and Dyspepsia

Generic Name: Asparagus

Category

Herbs & Supplements

Synonyms

Asparagamine A, Asparagus africanus, Asparagus gobicus, Asparagus officinalis, Asparagus racemosus, edible asparagus, gobicusin A, gobicusin B, iso-agatharesinol, Liliaceae (family), racemofuran, racemosol, Shatavari, sparagrass, Spargel (German), sparrow grass, sperage.

Background

In its wild form in Ancient Greece and Rome, asparagus was used as a diuretic (increasing urine flow) to flush out the kidneys and prevent the formation of kidney stones. In Asian medicine, asparagus root is given for cough, diarrhea, and nervous problems. Asparagus roots and leaves are used in Ayurvedic medicine for female infertility.

Today, asparagus is most often used as a food. There is very limited research in human on the medicinal uses of asparagus.

Evidence

DISCLAIMER: These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

Dyspepsia (upset stomach): Asparagus racemosus (Shatavari) is used in Ayurveda for dyspepsia (upset stomach). Additional study is needed before a firm conclusion can be made.
Grade: C

Galactagogue (promotes secretion of milk): Asparagus may help promote the secretion of milk in women. There is currently insufficient available evidence in this area. Additional study is needed.
Grade: C

Tradition

WARNING: DISCLAIMER: The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.
Antimicrobial, antioxidant, antispasmodic, antitumor, anxiety, aphrodisiac, blood cleanser, bronchial congestion, cough, demulcent (soothing action on inflammation), diabetes, diarrhea, digestive, diuretic (increasing urine flow), dysentery, food uses, gastric ulcers, hepatoprotection (liver protection), immunostimulation, improving resistance to disease, infertility, inflammation, joint pain and stiffness, kidney stones, liver disease, neurological disorders, rheumatism, soap, tonic, urinary tract inflammation.

Dosing

Adults (18 years and older)

There is currently no available scientific information about medicinal dosing for asparagus. Traditional dosing has used infusions, fluid extracts and alcoholic extracts for the treatment of urinary tract inflammation and kidney stones. A typical infusion dose uses 45-60 grams of cut herb in 150 milliliters of water and is taken daily by mouth. 45-60 milliliters of fluid extract has been taken daily by mouth. 225-300 milliliters of alcoholic extract (1:5 grams per milliliter) has also been taken daily by mouth.

Children (younger than 18 years)

There is currently no available scientific information about dosing for asparagus in children.

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