Radial veins

The radial veins run the length of the forearm just below the elbow, and follow the path of the radial bone, as well as a path somewhat comparable to the radial arteries. These veins assist draining deoxygenated blood from the hand and forearm. In this process, the blood flows to the brachial vein, and it eventually makes its way back the lungs for reoxygenation and to the heart for recirculation. This is an opposing process to the similarly named radial arteries. These arteries deliver oxygenated blood to the muscles and other components of the forearms. The radial veins are vena comitans. As such, they run parallel to their opposing arteries. This makes for a more efficient circulatory system. This is usually found in the extremities of the arms and legs. However, unlike the radial veins, not all components of the venal system work as vena comitans. For example, this complimentary relationship is not found with the subclavian artery and vein, or the axillary artery and vein.
Written and medically reviewed by the Healthline Editorial Team
Co-developed by:

In Depth: Radial veins

Debugging Tools

Level: 4
Frame: 6
Toggle Hotspot
VP Data Tool
HexTable json from Steve
Steve's ajax layer update call:
[still on original layer]

Ad values:

adModel.dfpAdSite: hn.us.hl.bm.x.x.x
adParams['k1']: othervasculardisease,radial_vein,9104159

More on BodyMaps

Take a Video Tour

Learn how to rotate, look inside and explore the human body. Take the tour

BodyMaps Feedback

How do you like BodyMaps? How can we improve it? Tell us what you think
Advertisement
Advertisement