Posterior pericallosal branch of the posterior cerebral artery

The posterior pericallosal branch of the posterior cerebral artery is one of the arteries serving the brain. It sometimes is not present, having combined with the anterior pericallosal branch via the process of anastomosis. It sometimes presents as a series of small arteries instead of one artery. It can have as many as three sources: the posterior cerebral artery the lateral choroidal artery posterior temporal artery The corpus callosum, a ten centimeter long structure which connects the left and right hemispheres of the brain with a dense fiber pathway, receives some of its blood supply from the pericallosal branches of the posterior and anterior cerebral arteries. Five to ten percent of ischemic strokes in the United States occur in the posterior cerebral artery. Death from this type of stroke is not common, but permanent visual impairment may occur. The most common cause of stroke resulting from occlusion of the pericallosal arteries is artherosclerotic plaques. Strokes resulting from the occlusion of the posterior pericallosal branch of the posterior cerebral artery are sometimes misdiagnosed as a middle cerebral artery infarct.
Written and medically reviewed by the Healthline Editorial Team
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In Depth: Posterior pericallosal branch of the posterior cerebral artery

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