Medial femoral circumflex artery

The medial femoral circumflex artery branches from the deep femoral artery and supplies the blood to the muscles of the middle of the thigh and hip joint. The blood comes from the heart down through the aorta into the common iliac artery, which branches off into the internal and external iliac arteries. The external iliac artery branches into several arteries, one of which is the femoral artery in the front part of the thigh. From there, the medial femoral circumflex artery branches centrally around the shaft of the femur. The femur is the longest and largest bone in the body, extending from the hip to the knee. The artery winds around to lie behind the femoral neck. In some cases, parts of the medial femoral circumflex artery can be used for coronary artery bypass grafts. An angiogram is done to determine if the artery is healthy enough to be used. During hip replacements there is danger of the medial femoral circumflex artery becoming damaged. Care must be taken to avoid injury and impairing healing after surgery.
Written and medically reviewed by the Healthline Editorial Team
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In Depth: Medial femoral circumflex artery

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