Medial cutaneous nerve

The medial cutaneous nerve in the body is located in the arm, where it is found spread through the middle of the arm, also known as the medial brachial area. It is also called the lesser internal cutaneous nerve in medical terminology, or the medial cutaneous nerve of the arm. This nerve is part of the brachial plexus group of fibers that goes from the spine, and it is the smallest nerve of this group. The brachial plexus provides a majority of the upper limbs skin and muscles with nerve fibers. It begins in the medial cords, and accepts fibers from thoracic and eighth cervical nerves. The lesser internal cutaneous nerve goes along the brachial artery and punctures into the deep fascia. The medial cutaneous nerve is present in the skin from the lowest portion of the back of the arm, sometime extending as high as the elbow. This nerve always works in communication with the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve of the ulnar branch.
Written and medically reviewed by the Healthline Editorial Team
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In Depth: Medial cutaneous nerve

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