This looks like water, but in it there are one milling worm eggs. If your doctor said drink them, it will help, would you?
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Jennifer Matthews: Six ounces of water and a million nearly-invisible worm eggs. This one's hatching. Now what if your doctor said, drink it? Amy Brandt: To be honest with you, I was so sick at the time, I would have done anything. Jennifer Matthews: Amy Brandt has inflammatory bowel disease. For more than two years, cramps, rectal bleeding and diarrhea were part of her daily life. Amy Brandt: I averaged, during that time, 20 trips to the restroom a day. I was on 26 pills a day at one point in time. Jennifer Matthews: Doctors planned to remove her colon. Instead, they enrolled her in an experimental study using helminths, or worms. Doctor Joel Weinstock believes as our society got cleaner, we got sicker. Dr. Joel Weinstock: So, it occurred to us that perhaps de-worming was a negative thing to do and may have led to the development of some of these immunological diseases. Jennifer Matthews: He speculates the worms help the immune system react to bacteria and disease. He says early studies look good. Dr. Joel Weinstock: After about two to four weeks, five of the six original patients went into complete clinical remission. Dr. Robert Summers: It has the potential to be used to treat either the active disease or maintaining people in remission. Amy Brandt: Yeah, back to normal! And, I really didn't ever think I was going to feel well again. Jennifer Matthews: As for Amy, she even encourages Isabel and grace to make mud pies now. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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