This health video will look into a wireless reflux test that can help those who suffer from GERD (Gastroesophageal reflux disease).
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There's more going on here than meets the eye. It's a tiny transmitter inside Lori Lassetter's body. As she eats, it detects any signs of the serious digestive disorder she developed six years ago. Dr. C. Daniel Smith: So, all of these devices sense or measure the amount of acid that actually percolates up from the stomach into the esophagus. With the older test, a narrow tube runs up the nose and down the throat. Dr. C. Daniel Smith: It was very uncomfortable to place cause it goes through the nose and sits there the entire time. Jennifer Matthews: Lori says it was awful. Lori Lassetter: It was also uncomfortable because if you turned your head you could feel the tube rubbing your throat, which would cause the gag reflex, which was not very pleasant. Dr. C. Daniel Smith: Universally every patient said, 'That was horrible,' and if, at some point in the future, that same patient needed that test repeated, by and large those patients refused because of how uncomfortable it was. Jennifer Matthews: A new test, called bravo, says good-bye to the tubes and wires. The tiny transmitter is placed just above the stomach and sends data to a belt clip recorder for two days. Patients say they barely feel it. Lori Lassetter: I don't feel it at all. I don't even know it's there. Jennifer Matthews: Now as Lori enjoys a good meal, her doctor can get the right diagnosis. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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