This video looks at the new research which could wipe out kidney cancer.
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Jennifer Matthews: Donald Jeffers finds solitude in his workshop. Donald Jeffers: It keeps you busy. I mean, I'm retired. I got to do something. Jennifer Matthews: It also takes his mind off his health. Donald was diagnosed with kidney cancer in 1981. He had a kidney removed, but the cancer came back in 1995. Donald Jeffers: I got hit in the head with a sledgehammer, and the prognosis was not good. Jennifer Matthews: He's tried several treatments -- anything that could offer a little hope and a longer life. Then, he found Doctor Walter Stadler who was studying a drug that was originally tested for colon cancer. Dr. Walter Stadler: We took a little bit of a broader view and said, 'Well, yes, this might be important in colon cancer, but let's take a look in other cancers as well.' Jennifer Matthews: That proved to be a monumental step. The drug, which researchers call the bay drug, inhibits cancer cell growth and cuts off blood supply to the tumor. It did not work for colon cancer. Dr. Walter Stadler: Surprisingly, we found that the patients with metastatic kidney cancer were experiencing tumor shrinkages. Jennifer Matthews: Specifically, 42 percent had their tumors shrink and another 26 percent had their tumors stabilize. With standard care, less than 15 percent of patients are helped. Dr. Walter Stadler: I think this is one of the most exciting things, I think, that has been happening in kidney cancer. Jennifer Matthews: After starting the drug, Donald's tumor shrank by 50 percent. Donald Jeffers: It was a great feeling. I mean, it's saying something worked. My outlook is better now than it probably was eight years ago. No doubt. Jennifer Matthews: This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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