What to Expect from A Child's Visit to the Doctor Video

Join a discussion about growth and development by Dr. Hands, who presents all that any parent would like to know about any health concern during the first few years of child's life. This video explains what to expect from a visit to the doctor.
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What to Expect from A Child's Visit to the Doctor The question mostly asked me by parents is what to expect from the physical examination and the visit to their physician. There are several areas that they should be prepared to discuss and to come with information that they can share with their physician. One is feeding history. Feeding history is very important and helps in the assessing the nutritional aspect of growth that the doctor needs to. Second thing is developmental history that needs to be able to supply a development history into fine motor, gross motor, adoptive and social function. And the pediatrician will usually ask questions and ask the parents to respond if their child is doing these things which he determines whether their age appropriate or not. Next is the physical exam itself and then here's a question period. And here’s where parent, if they come with a list of questions and they come prepared can really get the most out of the exam because if they come prepared with the time allotment for the exam, these questions can be covered and answered to their satisfaction and they will go away a lot more satisfied with their visit to the physician. The next thing is the doctor should tell them to what expect in the next month before the next visit. And also, tell them what their next visit and what to expect at that visit. They may also be immunizations and they may also be various blood tests that could be done at each of the exams depending upon the time in the child’s life. However, not everything is easy in a child’s physical exam. One, we have a problem with the child not responding well. The children are not always at ease in the doctor’s office. There are many ways that we try to put them at ease. One is we examine them at a non- threatening area. Two, we also try to elicit the parents help. We try to get the parents to hold them, to reassure them. We also try to make the room warm, the room pleasant, maybe have stuff animals, have toys, and have decorations that make the room very non- threatening. We try also if the baby is not ready for the exam perhaps to talk to the parent and not just to the child. Often taking your attention away from the child it makes the child relax. And this in turn allows you to do some of the exam while talking to the parent. Basically, there are little tricks on doctors as you Simon says to get certain responses. Some child -- the doctors allow the children to handle the equipment. Sometimes the children are given dolls to examine themselves while you're examining the child. The parent lap routine is often to use. Now this can be a limited in the sense that in certain aspects of the exam, its better done on a table. But certainly some can be done in the parent’s lap which gets the child to relax and be more reassured. Lastly, the doctor should never examine the painful area first and he tries to examine it last. So it’s important for the parents’ history to point out the problem, so he can reserve that to at last. And reassurance and gifts, prices, rewards by the parent during the exam or after the exam can be very helpful especially since visits to the doctor are quite frequent in early life and are going to be a repetitive phenomenal for the child.

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