What to Do About Milia Bumps on Your Baby's Face Video

Should you be worried about bumps on your baby's face?
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What to Do About Milia Bumps on Your Baby's Face Dr. Travis Stork: When it comes to a baby’s face and eyes nothing worries a mom more than bumps that appear on their face and joining us by phone from Auburn, Alabama is Anna. So Ana welcome to the show, what’s going on? Ana: Hey, my daughter Emily is seven weeks old. When she was born she’s having tiny pimple like bump on her teeth, is this something that I need to be concerned about. Dr. Jim Sears: Hey Ana, she is so cute. Dr. Lisa Masterson: Bravo, yes. Dr. Jim Sears: I can actually see a good picture of this and were she born with this? Ana: Yeah, every time they’ll now pop up in tragic places but even some that are reddish bumps taken in a picture you can kind of see it. The majority of them they are white but some it’s going to red. Dr. Jim Sears: I was actually going to ask you if you see red and surround them or not because babies get kind of two different kinds of bumps like this. There’s baby acne and then there’s something called milia and from the picture that I see it looks like your baby has the milia and it’s different than a pimple because a pimple is generally filled with pus and it’s basically an irritated and affected gland whereas milia, it starts with a gland but instead of pus being in there it’s actually old skin cells that just can’t get out that forms a little, almost a little cyst of old slipped off skin cells. You don’t want to go scrubbing this or squeezing this because that could make it a lot worst. Have you tried any creams? Ana: No, I have not. Dr. Jim Sears: Perfect, a lot of moms will maybe try to use an over-the-counter acne cream and those are really harsh for a baby skin. They could irritate. So the best thing to do for milia is nothing in a baby. They usually always go away within a few weeks or a few months. If you have this as an adult you probably see your doctor but the babies they usually always go away and it’s no problem.

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