Dr. Max Coppes of the Children's National Medical Center explains that stem cell transplants are formally known as bone marrow transplants in the medical community and what the difference is.
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Max Coppes: Stem cell has two meanings. We do a lot of stem cell transplants here, but not in the stem cell that the public now is starting to talk about i.e., when you have a sperm and an egg and put them together that's a stem cell. Our stem cell research are the bone marrow stem cell. So are they the stem cells that you and I carry inside of our bones that make our blood. It used to call, in the old days we call this bone marrow transplant. The reason why we have shifted away from the word bone marrow transplant has to do -- or 10 years ago and in some places that's still the case. The only way to get the bone marrow would actually be too literally poke in a bone put a needle in a bone, suck out the bone marrow. That would be, in a bag you would have the bone marrow and you would give it patient. Over the years we've found out that those cells that we try to get in a bag, that if you give a certain medicine you can actually push those cells out of the bone marrow and get them into the blood system and collect them in the blood. And what we collect in the blood is not -- we are not interested in the blood, we are interested in the stem cells that move out of the bone marrow into the blood and we collect them there. So because of that in the medical community we've kind of switched from bone marrow transplants to stem cell transplants because what we really are infusing in a patient are stem cells. So there is no ethical, it is no ethical question at all about those cells. We do not do, to my knowledge we don't do any research here on the say "controversial stem cells" and using them for treatment in cancer patients. So our stem cells are naturally occurring stem cells in you and me, in everybody.

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