Brian Gray went to the Middle East and almost lost his eye. In this video he talks about the healthcare system.
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Brian Gray: I did go over to the Middle East twice, and the last time I was there I was injured and they medivac me because they thought I was going to lose my left eye. My eye went from 20, 30 to 2200 overnight. So my cornea got totally scratched up, and they don't know what was going on. I couldn't see and it was totally shut. When I got out, I went to Florida to Bay Pines in St Petersburg, and down there I was treated very well. I don't have any problems with it. Now I am up in New Kansas and trying to just getting to see a doctor takes three four months just to see your primary care physician because they don't have either the manpower for it or something I am not really sure what, but they just don't have the time to get enough people in to see him on a normal basis. They tell you to go to the emergency room and if you go to the VA emergency room sometimes they all turn you away and say well we are not treating that here. So then you end up in a non-VA hospital and then you have to pay for that because the VA doesn't cover that because they didn't initially really "Tell you to go there" and I see that a lot because of what I do down in Wichita now. So now the veterans are getting slammed with the medical bills from the civilian hospital because the ambulance wouldn't take them to the VA hospital. So there is a lot of controversy about that within my area right now. Well, dealing with what I have to do with on a regular basis at my regional office, it would be nice to have something that would deal with the Fee Basis issue and that's what this would be under is what Fee Basis does. Fee Basis has to authorize the care for outside doctors and in Kansas there is not a lot of VA hospitals. They are tremendously overall within my state, yeah. Female Speaker: In the country though? Brian Gray: In the country I would say it varies tremendously too yeah, because what I have seen in Florida and within Kansas City those I can specifically talk about in more detail than the rest of the country, but from what I have seen within the country, yeah, it does vary. It varies tremendously. A lot of times the veterans administration, it seems like they shuffle their feet on it, they are not taking care of the issue. So a lot of these bills end up in collections, it starts moving the veteran's credit. It doesn't help them at all. They are only living off of maybe $2,000-3,000 a month, $600 just for an ambulance right from their home to the hospital is only 5 miles away and it would have been 3 miles to the VA hospital but they are not going to send to the VA hospital, they send to the other one. So there is $600 there and then the treatment itself to be anywhere from $1,000 to tens of thousands of dollars spending on the treatment, and a lot of this has got to come out of the veteran's pocket. If you'll look at it in a broader sense, the healthcare of the veterans affects the healthcare of every other person in the country too, in the way I am seeing it anyway. You have all these veterans that have served their country and they've done their job. You don't have enough facilities to actually help with the care of these veterans. So if they can't get it at the VA system, then they are going out to the civilian and the civilian hospitals are being overloaded with the emergency room care because of these veterans, that's making it more expensive for the regular people trying to get in there to try to take care of their own facilities or their own needs.

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