Vaginal Cyst Surgery Explained Video

OB/GYN Dr. Lisa Masterson demonstrates the surgery to remove a vaginal cyst. 
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Vaginal Cyst Surgery Explained Dr. Lisa: Okay. Let me tell you about the surgery. Surgery can be one of the bloodiest surgeries. You can lose some nerves function. If you have somebody who knows what there doing this is a really difficult surgery. They have to just know what they’re doing then you’re in good hands. Now let me explain to you what’s involve in to this surgery, so that maybe we can change some of your fears about a little bit. Okay? So I’m going to go over hereto our magic wall and show you how it starts. So this isn’t quite as cute as our squash. But basically we have, this is basically what our squash is showing us the side of lips or labia and this is the opening of the vagina and here is Bartholin's cyst right in there. That’s the negavit(ph) and what we do is we incise on the top of this and this is where we make the incision is actually inside the vagina. So it’s about 2/3rd inside the way of vagina. You’re not going to really see the scars, so deformity is usually not a problem really in good hands. To make an incision you pull back those labia and basically you don’t want to shell out this gland right here. Okay? So our next thing here is how we show that, we just take special curve scissors called Mets & Baum scissors and we just shell that. We take all of the little connections to the wall and again we shell it. This is the whole gland here as we take it out. And you see this just behind these are blood vessels and tissue. You want to get the whole gland, so they didn’t keep coming back after you go through all that, alright? And here we have again, so as you can see a little bit bigger. This is the gland as its coming out. You want it all the way out, Okay? So you see it a sac and it’s really quite large and deep and extensive, again there’s nerves and blood vessels. And when you get down to the bed, down here, that’s when it can really bleed and that’s when you use cutlery at the base because again you can really, really bleed with this. So you have to get it all the way out to use shell out the bed here. And then you have to build it up because you don’t want to be left with the defect in there. So then you close it in layers. So you see this is something you have done in an operating room. You have to be under anesthesia. You need to be able cope with bleeding problems and really visualize and see things. And so at the very ends which are going to have is this closed multiple layer closure with stitches and at the end you really shouldn’t see anything different. You should have, if every goes right you shouldn’t have any loss of feeling. You have two glands, so you should always have the same amount of lubrication. And that’s if everything’s goes right. So there is risk, Okay? How do you feel about it now? Charity: Well basically I want to know if you are me, would you have the surgery. Dr. Lisa: If it’s that often and you really can’t function, if that’s your lifestyle, yes I would just put the time into finding a surgeon who has done this before. And you need somebody who does these multiple times. And I hope these helps you, Alright. Thank you for being so great today.

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