Podiatrist and foot surgeon Dr. Ali Sadrieh demonstrates the TightRope procedure, a bunion surgery that allows patients to walk out of the operating room cast-free and offers a much shorter recovery time than traditional surgeries.
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Using the Tight Rope in Bunions Surgery Dr. Travis Stork: Podiatrists and foot surgeon Doctor Ali Sadrieh is joining us today to talk about an exciting new procedure that could change everything you’ve thought you knew about bunion surgery. Welcome back to the show. Dr. Drew Ordon: Welcome back. It’s always nice to have you. Dr. Ali Sadrieh: Thank you. Dr. Drew Ordon: So we hear this term all the time. What are bunions and what causes them? Dr. Ali Sadrieh: Bunion deformities are a growth or an enlargement of the side of the foot where the first metatarsal is the big toe. And it’s cause, because of the first metatarsal bone, the toe the bone behind the toe drifting away. So, it’s genetic. And then the shoes that women wear or the activities we do can actually make it worse. Dr. Drew Ordon: So, it’s primarily genetic but things you're doing to your feet may contribute to the problem. Dr. Ali Sadrieh: That is correct, so you inherit it and you could or could not develop it. Dr. Drew Ordon: So, tell us about a typical operation to fix it and what the recoveries are like. Dr. Ali Sadrieh: A typical bunion surgery, depending on the severity of the bunion requires a bone cut and sometimes the fusion, meaning connecting two bones together. That’s the difficult part because the patient has to be in a cast for two months. Dr. Drew Ordon: You're here today with something new, a new technique called the Tightrope. Tell us about that. Dr. Ali Sadrieh: The tight rope is remarkable because it takes a pretty simple foot process and brings it into surgery. What we do is we tie the two metatarsals together with a material called fiber wire. Now, this is the actual tight rope device, a larger version of if for demonstration purposes. This fiber wire is basically a suture, a thread that has metal impregnated in it so it’s really strong. This cannot be torn. And so, what we do is with this titanium buttons, we sew this around the two bones so over here, you see a perfect representation of this X-ray. This is the bunion deformity and you see the split. And so, in surgery, once we’ve placed this, we’re able to tie this bunion down slowly and you can actually see the reduction happening real tight, and that holds the bunion correction snug. It acts like an extra ligament holding these two bones together. Dr. Drew Ordon: And, you do this all at one surgery? Dr. Ali Sadrieh: One procedure, one session, and they’re done.

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