This medical video focuses on the new glue to use instead of stitches after eye surgery.
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Jennifer Matthews: It may sound unusual, but Victoria Monde is happy to be hitting the books. Surgery for cancer in her eye left her in stitches, but she wasn't laughing. Victoria Monde: The stitches were very uncomfortable. It's like sand being in your eye, and you want to constantly scratch it. Jennifer Matthews: Then she had a second surgery. This time doctors used glue instead of stitches to attach the needed donor tissue. Dr. Herbert Kaufman: As far as the patient is concerned, there are no stitches. There's no discomfort that goes with stuff in your eye afterwards. There's no taking out the stitches. The glue is a combination of fibrin - a blood clotting protein - and natural substances that keep it from dissolving quickly. When mixed, it's the sticky consistency of jelly. Dr. Herbert Kaufman: It's a glue that originally was developed and approved to seal blood vessels when they've been sewn together. Jennifer Matthews: In this demonstration the glue holds in place donor tissue that replaces a scarred cornea. Dr. Herbert Kaufman: Because it's natural even if some of the glue squishes out of the tissue around, the body will just get rid of that. Jennifer Matthews: Doctors say nutrients pass back and forth through the glue and keep the donor tissue alive. Vision is not distorted and patients say it isn't painful. Victoria Monde: I was expecting the itching and scratchiness but it wasn't. I was really surprised when I woke up. Jennifer Matthews: Cancer free and seeing clearly, Victoria can once again hit the books. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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