Using CPAP for Sleep Apnea Video

Shawn Ciecko MD ,Otolaryngologist, Medical School at University of Buffalo, resident in Otolaryngology, head and Neck Surgery at the Duke University Medical Center and ENTandAllergy Associate.
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Male 1: There’s CPAP machine. At first, it was used in little tiny premature babies to help them to breath. Now, we’re using it in adults, why? Shawn Clecko: Sure, a CPAP’s stands for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure. When you look at this, it’s a breathing machine that’s placed on at night to keep the airway open. Of you can imagine longer sleeping that with each breath, each time you breath in, you have some obstruction either to the level of the nose, the back of the throat, or lower down in the throat and if you have collapsed of those soft tissues, it’s going to cause a drop in the oxygen level in your blood, therefore giving you and apneac event and that’s sleep apnea. By putting positive pressure in the airway, you’re able to keep the airway open and allow the oxygen to go in and decrease the number of apneac events or pauses in breathing. Male 1: More it’s like a balloon. It keeps a lot of pressure to get that balloon start to get bigger. Once it starts, it’s easier to add. Shawn Clecko: It’s easy to keep open, exactly then the CPAP is very beneficial. It treats sleep apnea.

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