Dr. Mansfield describes how the sleep apnea surgery he performs at Alvarado Hospital is unique.
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I think that the organization of the phases of surgery is critical. You know, crawl, walk, run, fly. Start with the first, move to the second, move to the third in sequence to create a successful pathway for the patient, and second of all, there’s a significant technical skill required to perform the phases of surgery. It’s not something that somebody would want to undertake doing very few of these. You want to have hundreds if not thousands of these operations that you have performed to be able to offer the best success for the patient at the end of the day. And the reasons that we want to cure this problem that are so intense are because of the severity of the untreated disease and in a woman there are very particular things that happen in sleep apnea that one should consider in the treatment of a female patient. For example, the hormonal protections of youth in a woman are very powerful in helping young females with sleep apnea. But as they go through menopause and as they get older those hormonal losses actually aggravate their sleep apnea and we will see a dramatic rise in the postmenopausal woman sleep apnea, and that rise will continue. Therefore, treating the women at a younger age before they go through their menopausal circumstances is very important to prevent the serious risk factors of untreated sleep apnea.

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