Actress Sally Field, two-time Academy Award winner and star of the television show Brothers and Sisters, joins The Doctors to raise awareness about osteoporosis.
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Understanding Osteoporosis Dr. Travis Stork: Eight out of ten women would get this disease called osteoporosis, for those of you that don’t know what it means. Take a look at the scene I mentioned, our bones are living beans, constantly there's a battle going on with cells creating more bones, other cells taking away that bone. Overtime, you're looking on the animation, women can get stoop posture, the vertebral height can lessen, and basically those bones become more porous overtime. A good healthy bone has really good mineral density. Unfortunately, overtime as you lose that density, it becomes osteopenia, then osteoporosis, and then as the bone gets weak on the outside, it looks the same. But when it becomes weak on the inside, something as small as a sneeze, I kid you not, and that bone breaks and after a woman and a man experiences a fracture of the hip, there can be lifelong debilitation. Sally Field: Many percent of men are diagnosed with osteoporosis and the tests are becoming – as you all know are getting better and better, and better and more accurate. So we’re really able to take a look at things that we couldn’t before,. I know that my grandmother suffered from it and probably impinged on her life a great deal. But they didn’t have the test then, she was little and bent over and they would pat you and oh, that’s what happened tiny when you get old. And no, it's not. Dr. Travis Stork: It shouldn’t be. Dr. Jim Sears: I even talk to kids about bone health because you're making new bone, only until you're about age 30, and after that it starts to decrease, so you’ve got to get the good diet, the good exercise while you're young. Sally Field: Yeah, absolutely.

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