Understanding Motion Sickness Video

Plastic surgeon and board certified ear nose and throat specialist Dr. Drew Ordon demonstrates how motion sickness is primarily due to disruption of the inner ear, which modulates the body’s sense of balance and equilibrium.
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Understanding Motion Sickness Dr. Andrew Ordon: It can happen anywhere, in the car, you do a lot of boating. I’m sure you see people get motion sickness and get sea sick in the airplane. What it is? It’s a discoordination of two sensory receptors in your body. Your inner ear which modulates balance, there you see the inner ear and your eyes which take in those visual stimuli so there’s an imbalance between those two things which make you feel uncomfortable and nauseas. So there are a couple of things you can do to make it better. Number one, try to watch the motion, so if you’re in a boat at the bow of the ship. Doctor Jim Sears: Look forward, look at the horizon. Dr. Andrew Ordon: Don’t read, don’t face backwards, don’t watch somebody who’s not feeling well, who’s getting sick. Try not if you’re in the New York subway, get t away from that chilly onion dog that may smell because that may stimulate your senses as well. I mean should go away if you have a problem with this all the time then you may want your ear, nose, and throat doctor. He may want to prescribe medications

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