The Doctors and Everyday Health demonstrate how easy it is to improve your eye’s health by adding these four foods to your diet.
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Types of Food to Keep Your Eyes Healthy Dr. Travis Stork: We’re talking about ways to stop problems before they start. Now, it’s time for our new everyday health from A-Z segment. Today’s letter is E for eyes. We’re going to fill you on four foods that can help keep your eyes healthy. And I’m going to start because we’re talking about fish. Cold water fish, sardines, cod, mackerel things like tuna, believe it or not excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids which now and may be good for your eyesight. It may be good for dry eyes because whenever you blink that water film actually has oils in it and that coats the eyes. Jim are you okay? Dr. Lisa Masterson: That’s strong. Dr. Travis Stork: Jim is smelling these fish because --It really is. But it really important point here is that it’s not only good for your heart it’s good for your eyes because those fatty acids help make up the components of the oils that are produced from the glands in your eyelids that coat the part of the eye that keep it from getting dry. And we all know overly dry eyes can lead to infections, abrasions, amongst other things. Dr. Lisa Masterson: And another thing that’s great for eyes is eggs. Eggs can actually, potentially prevent macular degeneration. This is something that happens to our eyes as we get older. You get those yellow deposits under the eyes. They can affect your central vision which you used for reading and driving. So eggs have been found to have a compound called xantophylls which actually are antioxidants that helps slow on the damage that’s going to the eye that cause the macular degeneration. So make sure -- Dr. Travis Stork: And you know what macular degeneration is a tough thing to live with. We have this favorite little—I love this because it shows everyone out there. If you don’t have macular degeneration, what’s going to happen if you do get it. Dr. Lisa Masterson: At central -- Dr. Travis Stork: You can’t drive. You can’t read. So prevention is key. I love it when you bring out red wine and say that -- Dr. James Sears: This is going to be good for you and we’re talking— Dr. Travis Stork: In moderation. Dr. James Sears: Something else that happens to the eyes, cataracts. Cataracts are actually very common. I think over 50% of elderly people will get some sort of cataracts. You get that cloudiness of the lens of the eye and it’s a huge problem. But the anthocyanins that are in the grapes that make the wine are so good. It’s a antioxidant that really helps increase blood flow to pretty much all of the body but especially the eye. Dr. Travis Stork: And the things that are heart healthy are also eye healthy. Dr. James Sears: There you go. Dr. Lisa Masterson: It’s great. Dr. Andrew Ordon: It’s just healthy all around. That’s why I’m going to talk about garlic as it relates glaucoma, another eye condition that’s pretty common. It’s degeneration of the ganglion cells of the retina associated with increased pressure inside your eye. Why garlic? Garlic contains sulfur. Sulfur is needed to produce glutathione, very important protein that is part of keeping the inside of your eye those retinal cells healthy. So add garlic to your diet. You’re helping your eyes. Dr. Travis Stork: So I figure out a new way that this can help with dry eyes. You smell it, you just smell it. Dr. Lisa Masterson: But you know I’m taking a cooking class this summer. I’m going to try -- Dr. Travis Stork: Are you? Dr. Lisa Masterson: Yes. I’m going to try and find something that uses all of these. Dr. Travis Stork: Nice. Yey for us so it’s really be your beginning day today. Dr. Lisa Masterson: There you go. Dr. Travis Stork: So take care of your eyes because no one knows how difficult it is to live your life without your eyesight until you lose it. For more information, go to the DoctorsTV.com or visit EverydayHealth.com for more health from A-Z.

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