Two Myths About Diabetes Video

Dr. Kimberly Buss debunks two myths about diabetes and diabetes patients’ lives.
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Female Speaker: Every week Dr. Kimberly Buzz educates her patients in this class room. Male Speaker: I just took another test on private. Female Speaker: Oh, My gosh! Well, you probably have the results. Oh 8.6. So up a little bit, but that's okay. So your last one was 7.9, which we now know almost get you the aha. In fact, I'm going to say yes, if you get the congratulations aha, which was a fabulous, fantastic improvement from were you have been. Now, it's got up a little bit 8.6, but that's okay, still definitely lower than it had been in the past. How have your sugars been? Male Speaker: The sugars have been excellent. Female Speaker: Really? That's great. Male Speaker: I don't think I've had the blood sugar higher than 185, since the last month. So the average is which mean 108 about a 96 and about a 120. Female Speaker: Oh you should look perfect then? Male Speaker: Yeah. Female Speaker: So I'm not going to believe the A1C test. Female Speaker: Diabetes is such a dilemma that for some, one on one doctor appointments are now becoming group appointments. Male Speaker: The big meal side -- Female Speaker: Diabetes is still the discussion outside the classroom wall. Dr. Buzz breaks down the facts from fiction. Female Speaker: The number one myth is that you can't ever eat food you love again. Male Speaker: Do you have milk Gabrielle? Female Speaker: When people first get diagnose of diabetes, often their family members will say, you can't have that, you can't have that, you can't have that, you can't cake, you can't have cookies, you can't have fruit, and you can't have a wide variety of foods that have -- and that, I think that frightens off patients, and it's a myth. People with diabetes can eat a huge variety of foods, and they too can have foods that are special to them. They just have to have them in much smaller quantity. I think the another fundamental method of diabetes is that once you got diabetes there is really not much you can do to change it that that's just an evitable part of your future. Female Speaker: And that same thought can lead to the depression, frustration, and often sadness. Female Speaker: They hear the word diabetes and in the worse case scenario, they think it's a death sentence because they don't have the knowledge of the understanding. Female Speaker: But, there is something healthy for the mind and body, exercise. When you exercise, your insulin works more effectively, but this isn't always the case for pregnant woman. Female Speaker: When you become pregnant, your insulin doesn't works well. Regardless, -- about diabetes or not. But some people fundamentally have their insulin start to working much less effectively their your body, and those people develop gestational diabetes. They may very well have their diabetes disappear, the day the baby is born. However, about 60% of them will go on to the develop type II diabetes. Female Speaker: Well, there is no cure you can manage diabetes to a healthy lifestyle and medication. So the American Diabetes Association, which is one of the major organizations that makes recommendation about treating diabetes has recommended that all people who get diagnosed your babies, at the time of diagnosis consider starting that format. Even if their blood sugar seem relatively well controlled at the time. Female Speaker: You keep your diabetes well controlled. We have a lot of hope that we can protect your heart over the long-term.

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