Treating Urinary Incontinence Video

This health video explores the methods which are being used to treat urinary incontinence.
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Jennifer Matthews: Running, lifting, jumping, even walking. All tasks most women take for granted. But not Claudia Brown. Claudia Brown: If I were going on a jog or a walk, I would you know I couldn't go for more than a mile from home. Jennifer Matthews: That's because Claudia has urinary stress incontinence, a condition that causes her bladder to leak urine. Claudia Brown: You always had to be at some conscious level of where the restrooms were. Jennifer Matthews: Doctor Catherine Nichols says the condition often occurs after pregnancy or a hysterectomy. Catherine Matthews-Nichols: The biggest problem with incontinence, I think, is the reluctance on the part of the patients to seek care. Jennifer Matthews: Invasive surgery used to be the only option for some. But now, there's a new way to help women. Through a small incision, a sling, like this, supports the urethra and holds it in place to stop the bladder from leaking. Catherine Matthews-Nichols: The recovery time is much, much quicker. The operating time is much, much quicker, and the complications are probably less than the gold standard operation. Jennifer Matthews: With the old surgery, 60-percent of patients report relief. 80-percent of women benefit from the new sling procedure. Claudia had the procedure two weeks ago. Claudia Brown: It was an absolute breeze, an absolute breeze. It's just huge relief. I can't, I can't express it, really, it's just an absolutely wonderful thing. Jennifer Matthews: And now, she can walk right by the restroom without stopping. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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