Head and neck surgeon Dr. Ryan Osborne shares simple, at-home tips for treating painful salivary stones.
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Treating Salivary Stones Dr Travis Stork: Before the break, we were talking with Dr. Osborne about a new procedure for removing stones from the salivary gland but before it gets to that point, there are actually some things you can try if you're experiencing symptoms of an obstructed duct. So, what are these tips, Dr. Osborne? Dr. Ryan Osborne: Well, they’re pretty simple. In general, just like with your plumbing system, you want to keep the water flowing. So, the first thing you have to do is you need water in your system so stay hydrated. You want to drink as much water as you can. Now, in addition to that, how can you get the pressure moving, because that’s another part. There’s water and there is water pressure. Simple enough, believe it or not, this is the most mouth watering experience you're going to have is take a bite of a lemon. Dr Travis Stork: Anyone ever take -- you take that bite and all of a sudden your mouth is full of fluid? That’s your saliva coming to those salivary glands. Dr. Ryan Osborne: Absolutely. Dr. Jim Sears: So, you should get a shot, and why? Dr. Ryan Osborne: So, we move to some things like lemon drops, sour candies and things of that nature. These things will generally allow the salivary flow. What I use is I actually use vitamin C powder. I use that in the office. It’s immediate, and it really gets that gland going. Dr Travis Stork: You throw a little vitamin C powder on the mouth and things are flowing. Dr. Ryan Osborne: You pull a little vitamin C powder, and it’s going to flow. There's no question. Dr. Jim Sears: It’s like a plunger. Dr. Ryan Osborne: Absolutely. So those are probably -- the simplest thing you can do is you stay hydrated and use something fairly sour. We call all these things sialagogues. Big word, all it means is something sour that’ll make you produce saliva. Dr Travis Stork: Well, thanks for those great tips. We appreciate it. Dr. Ryan Osborne: No problem.

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