Traditional Insulin Delivery Methods Video

In this medical health video learn how doctors discuss the pros and cons of current insulin delivery methods. Is the i-port covered by insurance?
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TRADITIONAL INSULIN DELIVERY METHODS Rajat Bhushan: Most commonly the insulin is given by injections, now in the olden time needles used to be very big, and you had to recycle the syringes. Now we have disposable, very small, tiny needles. So that's the most common way of using it. But with the accuracy, is not as good because patient has to use visual thing. So the pen has become a big choice, and you can use the dose more correctly. You can fine-tune the insulin dose, and it's more portable. You don't have to carry all the things with you. Pen comes loaded with the insulin and you just have to dial the right number and you attach needle and take the shot. Thomas Blevins: Some people are attached to that, they are used to the vial and the syringe, and they are very attached to that, and they are very good at it, and they don't have any issues. The con I think of a vial and syringe is that you have to carry it around with you. It's a lot of what I would call Paraphernalia, and lot of logging around things. And you have to keep the bottle -- you don't have to keep it refrigerated necessarily, but it's important to not let it get too hot, too cold. The advantage of the pen, whether you use it with an injection port or not is that it's a very portable way to carry insulin. It doesn't look like a bottle, and it doesn't look like a syringe, and it's something that looks like a big pen, and you can put it right here in the pocket and carry with you. And most people think that's probably a marker of some sort. So it's very portable, that's the advantage. This advantage of the pen, I can't think of very many. Now there used to be kind of a cost disadvantage, but I think now the pens are compatible cost-wise to the vial. Rajat Bhushan: Pump is a device which can allow you to continuously receive insulin, and with a computer-driven algorithm you can make a diet, those corrections for amount of food you are eating and your blood sugar. It's most convenient way, and most accurate way of giving insulin, but because of complexity it's not as commonly used. Thomas Blevins: You wear it now of the day, you wear every single hour of the day, and because it's constantly infusing insulin, and so has to be worn all the time, and the infusion set is worn all the time and the pump is worn all the time. Rajat Bhushan: They don't have to take off pump for any kind of usual activities, but suppose they are going swimming, or it's a beach day, then they have to be temporarily taken off, and that can be done up to two-three hours, they can detach themselves with the pump, and do their activity, and then go back on pump. Thomas Blevins: There are some patients who just don't have the dexterity to use the pump, and they just don't have the ability to interact with the pump, and you do have to interact with the pump. I mean, the pump is a great way to give insulin, it's very consistent, and it can really even out control for those that we put on pump. But that there are some patients who can't do it, simply can't do it.

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