Track Star Movement Disorder Video

Learn about Track Star Movement Disorder. Dr. Stack demonstrates again his research and findings on the physical disabilities related to the TMJ, or TMD as it is clinically called.
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Dr. Travis Stack: This is a 17 year old high school track star that was in a motor vehicle accident in January 28. She was rear ended one evening. You'll notice as the tape goes on, that she has been to 33 other healthcare providers including some of the most prestigious universities and hospitals in the Washington metropolitan area. She has been confined to a wheelchair and told that she would remain in there for the rest of her life. Notice the time; it is 2.37 on June 20. We are inserting a mandibular orthotic for which we took the impressions of her lower jaw, approximately three days previous to today. That was the first time we've seen her. We put this appliance in, on June 20. I measured her mouth opening and she can open approximately 20 millimeters. This was the one diagnostic feature that most previous healthcare professionals missed. Prior to setting the appliance, I frequently do some osteopathic adjustments on the upper jaw to give the patient on running start in the response to their treatment. This is particularly true for post orthodontic patients, who have had constrictive type mechanics applied to their maxilla. By this wearing a head gear, extractions et cetera. This is an adjustment that loosens up all facial bones, if any of them are stuck or lock. We do that movement about 10 times. Okay, I have inserted her lower appliance and now I'm in the process of adjusting it. I'm showing the patient here, how much it strengthens her upper arm to convince her to wear the appliance all the time. It is an attempt to show her that the appliance will benefit her by increasing her upper body strength. Notice the time now. One hour has elapsed, since the patient arrived at the office. This is the first time she has walked, taken many steps in many months. Notice when she gets up, she does not use her left hand or arm. She has lost the use of it. The patient returns four days later without her wheel chair. I instructed a walk around the office while we are working on other patients. Notice, she still does not use her left arm. We are going to insert her upper appliance today. This is it. It is a appliance made of stainless steel and gold called an alternative light force appliance. I'm inserting it in the mouth to sit it and in a few minutes after I adjusted, I will bond it in place. This was the patient with the appliance fitted. Notice, she is walking much better. We adjusted a little further and each time we adjusted, she walks more freely. I'm now adjusting the lower appliance to the upper so that they both fit in harmony with each other. I'm using carbon paper to check any high spots on the lower appliance, that in putting in the upper appliance may have caused and I just use a drill to rebalance the appliance, so that it hits simultaneously in time and in pressure on both left and the right sides. I usually do this two or three times. Here I'm just showing the patient, the improvement in her upper body strength. Notice, she started to swing her left arm. The appliance is being bonded into place now and her lower appliance is being readjusted. Notice the movement of her left arm. Actually, the movement returned within the hour of that appointment. But this is a three week return visit.

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