Tiny Instruments Make Surgery Less Invasive Video

This health video focus' on how tiny instruments used these days make surgery less invasive.
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Dr. Dean Edell: Dermatologist Robert Feinstein is used to treating patients, not being one. So he had to follow his own advice when his doctor told him he had colon cancer. Dr. Robert Feinstein: I always told them that if you get bad news, don't panic. Think about it. Dr. Dean Edell: Feinstein found a surgeon who would remove his tumor using minimally invasive techniques. Dr. Richard Whelan: We can do just as radical an operation laparoscopy as we can do open. Dr. Dean Edell: A seven year study of colon cancer patients found no difference in survival or recurrence when comparing laparoscopic and open surgery. Dr. Jay Redan: You are going to get the same results, same survivals. However, the big difference is they are going to have much less pain, faster recovery. Dr. Dean Edell: For cancer patients that can mean starting chemotherapy sooner. Dr. Jay Redan: So we can start the treatment sooner you are going to kill off any microscopic tumor cells that maybe around. Dr. Dean Edell: Minimally invasive procedures can be used to repair ventral hernias, treat colon diseases, perform hysterectomies and even remove cancerous tumors, appendices and gallbladders. In most cases patients are up and around in hours and days rather than weeks or months. Dr. Robert Feinstein: Within one week of having the surgery I was well enough that I was able to walk close to a mile. Dr. Richard Whelan: If anyone tells you have to have an open operation, I would always recommend to someone to seek out a possible alternative. Dr. Dean Edell: I am Dr. Dean Edell.

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