Learn how to treat Tic Bites and what the potential risks of in such cases. Beth Gottlieb MD Ped Rheumatology
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Interviewer: If you come home at night, in the park, you see a tic on your skin, what would you tell the patient if you saw a tic bite? How would you approach that? Interviewee: The most important thing is that for people who go to camp or they go out to the beach, it is very important every night to shower or to bathe and to use a washcloth and just rub the washcloth over the skin. You want to make sure that you do that around the neck, all the way around the neck, under the arms and around the groin area where you bend your legs because those are places that the tics like. The tic will attach on to the ankles, crawl up to a nice warm, moist spot and that is why those areas are favorites of the tic and will sit there. The tic has to be attached for at least 24 hours in order to transmit the infection that causes Lyme disease so if you are in the beach in the morning or you are hiking somewhere where you know is an area that there are tics that carry Lyme and you shower at night even if you find the tic that falls off, it would not be there long enough to cause the infection. So, if you do that every night you are really protecting yourself. Interviewer: So, preventative care covering up areas that are exposed is a wise idea. Interviewee: Definitely, definitely important.

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