The Test that can Detect H5N1 Strain of Avian Flu Video

Learn about the test that can rapidly detect the H5N1 strain of avian flu in this medical report.
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Dr. Susan Sharma: This is Insidermedicine in 60. From New York - In an article published in the New England Journal of Medicine, New York City Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas Frieden, makes a case for taxing sweetened beverages. He argues that a penny per ounce excise tax could reduce consumption of these products by over 10%. He also states that taxes on tobacco have been successful and there is evidence that higher prices reduce soda consumption. From Washington - The FDA has approved a test that can rapidly detect the H5N1 strain of avian flu. This new test identifies a key protein of the infection in throat or nose swabs, and can provide results in about 40 minutes compared to current tests, which can take three to four hours. Since 2003, there have been 417 confirmed cases of human infection with the virus in 15 countries with 257 deaths. And finally, from Boston - According to research in the journal Circulation Heart Failure, an expanding waistline correlates an increased risk for heart failure. In a study of over 80,000 people, researchers found that every 10-cm increase in waist circumference has raised the risk of heart failure hospitalization and death by 15% to 20%. The researchers note that this study only shows an association, not cause and effect. For Insidermedicine in 60, I'm Dr. Susan Sharma.

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