The Signs That Led to My Depression Diagnosis Video

Members of the Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance (DBSA) community discuss the signs and symptoms that led up to their diagnosis of depression or bipolar disorder in this video.
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Female Speaker: Host: There are about 23 million people in the United States who are estimated to have been diagnosed or living with a mood disorder of some kind depression or bipolar illness. Female Speaker: My diagnosis is bipolar disorder. Male Speaker: Bipolar disorder. Female Speaker: Bipolar too. Carroll Young: Acute schizoid. Male Speaker: Bipolar. Female Speaker: Bipolar disorder. Sonia Denice Harris: Depression. Thomas Johnson: Depression and bipolar. Male Speaker: Bipolar/ADHD. Just Diagnosed Carroll Young: I was diagnosed in 1987 and the process that got me there was I wasn't sleeping and I had, I supposed what a person could an acute break with reality. So I end up in hospital. Thomas Johnson: I was 39; it was 1984 when I was first diagnosed. I was diagnosed as having biochemical depression. I had retreated to my home completely, I couldn't work, I couldn't do anything at all. Sonia Denice Harris: Well, I was first diagnosed in 1999 and the event that led up to my diagnose was work related, something had happened to me, that was very tragic at work. And that's when I first heard about you know been diagnosed with depression. Carroll Young: I started to not sleep in order to work on stuff. And so it got so after a number of days that I was sleeping probably about three-and-a-half hours in the evening which was near enough for me, and as I became more-and-more sleep-deprived I began to become more delusional, my thinking become muddled and I experienced a kind of psychosis. Thomas Johnson: I attempted suicide in my work, digressed badly between 1984 and 1994. I attempted suicide in 1991. My wife came home from work early and found me. Family Ties My younger brother who I believe has same - my mom and same mom, but different dads, but he suffers from depression and bipolar. He is ten years younger than I am, and we believe that was also true for my one sister. Sonia Denice Harris: I do have a family history of depression. I have my mom suffered with depression, but of course I didn't hear about it until after passing. Carroll Young: I think friends act as a mirror, friends and family; and at a time where my thinking was somewhat muddled they provided a clear accurate mirror of my behavior, what I was doing for instance like, while I was in the hospital I talked to my sister and I said, "Joyce, I can't understand while when I am talking to the nurses they don't say anything they just don't respond like I am not there." And she said, "Well, you are talking, but you don't know all the talking, and it's not a two-way process." And so I sort of understood that I wasn't communicating. A desire to communicate, but I wasn't.

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