The Risks of Not Taking Prescribed Medicines Video

Learn about how patients that suffered a heart attack and didn't take their prescription medicines following discharge from hospitals were 80% more likely to die during the first year, oppose to those who took all of their medicines.
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Dr. Susan Sharma: This is insidermedicine in 60. From Toronto, in a study of over 4,000 patients who suffered a heart attack, those who took none of their prescription medicines following discharge from hospital were 80% more likely to die during the first year following the event when compared to those who filled all of their prescriptions. Commonly prescribed medicines following heart attack include, beta-blockers, ACE inhibitors and statins. From Boston, in a study of energy-efficient light bulbs, researchers have found that the popular compact fluorescent bulbs pose a threat of mercury poisoning if they are broken. Although the bulbs only use about 1% of the mercury found in old thermometers, some of that mercury can be vaporized into the air if the light breaks. Vacuuming the shards is not recommended, instead use cardboard or index cards to pick up the pieces, wipe the area thoroughly with a damp paper towel, and ventilate the room. While CFL bulbs remain a good investment for their energy saving properties, they should never be thrown in the trash. Many stores and municipalities are beginning to offer CFL recycling facilities, and you should contact your local authorities for more information. And finally, from the UK, a meta-analysis is casting doubt on the efficacy of SSRIs for the treatment of all but severe depression. Researchers noted that those who received these medicines rarely had an improvement in symptoms that were significantly better than those taking placebo. Only those with severe depression demonstrated any significant therapeutic benefit. For insidermedicine in 60, I'm Dr. Susan Sharma.

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