Learn how human cells have been coaxed into becoming functioning blood vessels in mice in this medical report.
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Dr. Susan Sharma: This is insidermedicine in 60. From Washington, according to a study published in Circulation Research, human cells have been coaxed into becoming functioning blood vessels in mice. Researchers from Harvard Medical School used immature human cells and implanted them into mice. Once implanted, the cells grew into a ball of healthy blood vessels. This research could lead to a way to replace blocked or damaged blood vessels following a heart attack or a stroke. From Chapel Hill, according to research in the journal Stroke, postmenopausal women who get too much or too little sleep may be at increased risk for stroke. Researchers from the University of North Carolina studied over 93,000 women between the ages of 50 and 79 and found that those who slept fewer than 7 or more than 9 hours per night had a higher risk for stroke than those that slept 7 to 8 hours. And finally, from Montreal, according to a study published in Genes and Development, Canadian and European researchers have isolated the gene that regulates ovulation. The gene, referred to as Lrh1, can both regulate and block ovulation which, according to the researchers, may offer new possibilities for fertility and contraceptive treatments. The research team has received a five-year grant to pursue this discovery. For insidermedicine in 60, I'm Dr. Susan Sharma.

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