This health video focuses on a little girl's struggle with her heart and how she was fitted with a second heart to increase her survival rate.
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Jennifer Matthews: It's natural for most two-year-olds to be active and curious, but Camila Gonzalez isn't like most kids. Maria Gonzalez: Don't play, doesn't play, doesn't want to make the cartoons, see the cartoon, nothing. Jennifer Matthews: Camila has a heart condition called Cardiomyopathy, where the heart muscle is weak, causing blood pressure to rise in the lungs. In Camila's case, it was five-times higher than normal. Dr. Daniel Bernstein: The chances of her surviving longer than another year would've been pretty small. Jennifer Matthews: The question was not whether Camila needed a transplant, but what kind. When Doctor Daniel Bernstein suggested adding a second heart to Camila's damaged one, Camila's mom was understandably worried. Maria Gonzalez: I said 'what?!' I never see that. I never hear that, too. So, I think you are going to practice on my baby. Dr. Daniel Bernstein: We just told her mom everything we knew about this and everything we didn't know about it, and ultimately, it was her choice. Jennifer Matthews: Camila's family did agree to the second heart. The idea was developd in England about 30 years ago and is called a piggyback transplant. The procedure requires surgeons to link Camila's existing heart with her new donor heart. Dr. Daniel Bernstein: These are her two hearts beating inside her chest as imaged by an MRI scanner. The right side, of her own heart, is pumping blood to the lungs. The left side, the donor heart, is pumping blood to the body. Jennifer Matthews: Since the surgery, Camila's parents say the change has been extraordinary. Maria Gonzalez: She's moving around the house. She plays a lot. I see I think she's happy. Jennifer Matthews: Proof that sometimes two hearts really are better than one. This is Jennifer Matthews reporting.

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