This science video looks at how to explore Mars, and focuses on the Phoenix Mars mission.
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Rebecca Bracken: After years of watching side by movies do it. We are finally searching for life on the Red Planet. Hi, I'm Rebecca Brayton and welcome to watchmojo.com and today we will be shredding some light on the Phoenix Mars Mission. Tell us about the Mars Mission? Andrew Fazekas: The Mars Mission is really something that is very unique right now in expedition of planets. First of all, it's an International Mission. The phoenix Lander which landed in the May of this year is unique because it has landed in the far North of Mars. This is the first time we are actually exploring the Northern Arctic region of another planet. Its really need mission because it's going to be looking for water. That's really the Mantra of NASAS exploration of the Red Planet is looking for water because we think water is the key ingredients for life. Rebecca Bracken: How did they finally manage to get there? Andrew Fazekas: This mission is been under works for over a five years and it took over ten months for the probe to actually arrive at Mars and the last nine minutes which where it enters the atmosphere of Mars and lands is the most nail biting time for the team, the Mission Team, because there has been so many failures. Rebecca Bracken: Tell us about the Red Planet about Mars Andrew Fazekas: Mars is really a planet of extremes, and I would say probably it's going to be a key destination for any extreme sport lovers. It has the largest mountain in the Solar System on Olympus, three times higher than Mount Everest. It has the largest Canyon system that would span the entire North American Continent, three times deeper than the Grand Canyon. It's just got huge amounts of craters, it's got deserts. It's a very inhospitable world though, because the average temperature during the day time is minus 80 degree Celsius, goes down to minus 150 degrees at night time and sand storms can kick up to a 150 Km per hour winds. Rebecca Bracken: Can study in Mars tell us anything about earth? Andrew Fazekas: This is going to help us understand the climate change that we are experiencing here on Earth. So by looking at other dynamic weather systems on other Worlds and Mars is the most earth like it will help us, basically better the computer models that we use to track everything, to understand things like the hurricanes like Hurricane Country. Rebecca Bracken: Have there been any discoveries yet? Andrew Fazekas: Plan Phoenix had landed the Frusters that helped to touch down so gently, basically brushed away the top soil and exposed fresh ice, Water ice and that was like the most amazing thing and of course the Robotic arm that's attached to the Lander has been scraping up this ice and analyzing it. Rebecca Bracken: What is the future for Humans on Mars? Andrew Fazekas: Right now NASA has a plan, a long-term plan that is sending humans to Mars by the year 2030 and the key component is bringing resources and now that we found water on Mars this is going to elevate a lot of problems. Water of course can be used to not just makes a Green Houses, make food for us and drink the water but also make Rocket propellant its a key ingredient for making a fuel for rockets, which would allow them to come back home. Humans will probably land within the next few decades on the Red Plant Rebecca Bracken: Thank you very much Andrew Fazekas: Thank you.

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