The Menopause Book Video

Over thirty-seven million women are looking for up to the minute comprehensive advice on one of the most significant transitions in their life: menopause. Better has some tips on what to expect from menopause and how to deal with it when it comes.
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Audra Lowe: Over 37 million are looking for up to the minute comprehensive advice on one of the most significant transitions in their life, menopause. Now, a new book is out covering the latest advancements in hormone therapy protecting your memory mood swings and even sleep. The Menopause Book was co-authored by Barbara Kantrowitz. She’s a former Newsweek senior health and women’s issues editor and she’s here to day to pretty much help explain a lot of what's in this book here today. It’s pretty think. There’s a lot to cover, right? Barbara Kantrowitz: Right. Audra Lowe: How are you? Barbara Kantrowitz: I’m good. I’m good. Audra Lowe: Good, now, when did you guys start off by saying, “Hey, look, we’re just going to put together all the difference scenarios we can think off, put it into one book,” because there is a lot to cover here. Barbara Kantrowitz: Well, basically, what happened is my co-author and I had questions about what was happening to our bodies at this time of life and we sat around thinking we wish we had a book like what to expect when you’re expecting, which we use when we were pregnant. We wanted that same book for menopause and we found there wasn’t one, we decided to write it ourselves so just question and answer the same format and we’ve tried to keep it a very conversational tone. Audra Lowe: And you definitely do. I mean as we’ve just mentioned, 37 million women looking for up-to-date information and a couple of the things that you talk about in your book are, who the best candidates are for hormone replacement therapy? Who should avoid it? Who’s the best candidate? What would you say to that? Barbara Kantrowitz: Well, there is no one answer for all women and a decade ago, its seem as though there was an answer, all women should take hormone therapy and then there was a big federal study that kind of made a lot of women think, no women should take hormone therapy. In fact, there are some women for whom it might be a good idea. Women who’ve gone through menopause early because they’ve had their ovaries removed, women who might be prone to osteoporosis, which is a disorder of thinning bones. They might want to consider hormone therapy. You shouldn’t take it if you have breast cancer in your family or if you yourself have had breast cancer or if you’re at risk for stroke or heart disease but these are the decisions you can discuss with your doctor and he or she will be able to weigh the specific risk and benefits in your case. Audra Lowe: And another big question that a lot of women have and you do answer and touched on this on your book. Does progesterone cream stop hot flashes? Barbara Kantrowitz: There is no evidence that it does. A lot of women believe it does, it’s a product that’s sold in health and food store. I have many friends who use it but there’s absolutely no scientific evidence that it works. Audra Lowe: Wow, it’s interesting. Okay what about as far as—can menopause ease migraines or does it make it worst. I mean what’s your check on that? Barbara Kantrowitz: Well, you’re always looking for good news and this is one of them. If you’ve been suffering from menstrual migraine which are migraines that occur around the time with your period, they will get better after menopause. They make it slightly worst just before menopause which is just before your periods end. But once your period’s end, those kinds of migraines will disappear. If you have migraines for other reasons, if the triggers are chocolate or wine or something else, it doesn’t affect it so much. But menstrual migraines, which are very, very common, will disappear. Audra Lowe: Interesting. And panic attacks. There’s a section in here about that too. Barbara Kantrowitz: Yeah, it’s really interesting, a lot of women experience panic attacks for the first time around menopause and it can be a very scary thing. You kind of feel like you’re having a heart attack and it can be debilitating. They can come on suddenly, so a lot of women becom

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